Harmonic series chord progressions

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by SmoothOperator, Nov 30, 2014.

  1. SmoothOperator

    SmoothOperator Mezzo Forte User

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    Is there a name for chord progression following harmonic series (or reverse)?

    I'm sure some one will point out that all chords follow the harmonic series, so an example is like this:

    I I V I iii V iiv I ii iii vb V iv iivb iiv I
     
  2. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    It's getting towards parallel chords on the natural harmonic series, though strictly speaking that should be either all major chords or all minors with the voices at fixed intervals.

    Bartok used parallel chords a fair bit for a heavy 'ancient' effect; the Simpson's theme uses the acoustic scale (the top nine notes of your sequence) for a different one; so it might come out as some wyrd fusion of the two.
     
  3. SmoothOperator

    SmoothOperator Mezzo Forte User

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    I didn't notate it, but I think they could be played in inversions, otherwise it would have a strong parallel voicing. Also, I think there could be other variations on the chords ie ii7. Especially for the chords based on non scale tones iivb, vb, ivb could easily be diminished chords.

    I'm sure its been done before, and I can just look it up.
     
  4. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    I shouldn't have bothered should I
     
  5. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

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    Hawaian homey
    What on earth is a "iivb" chord?
     
  6. SmoothOperator

    SmoothOperator Mezzo Forte User

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    That is a mistake, it should be major. VIIb is a chord based on the dominant seventh.
     
  7. chisa

    chisa New Friend

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    someone don't know roman numerals!
     
  8. SmoothOperator

    SmoothOperator Mezzo Forte User

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    Here is a more likely progression(has any one else noticed safari doesn't like your chord spelling?)

    I I V I iii V VII I ii7 iii7 Vb7 V vi7 VII vii* I

    The vii* is a diminished seventh chord. I figure the none scale tone center VII will be major, drop the root of the diminished seven. The Vb will probably be a major dominant seven, since the dominant seventh is a major third interval, and can be obtained via a tritone substitution from a I7 chord.
     
  9. Honkie

    Honkie Pianissimo User

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    I'd say the well-tempered scale and the harmonic series are enemies, not friends.
     
  10. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

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    Hawaian homey
    Write it the way you say it. It avoids ambiguity.

    Vb7 implies "five flat 7". Is that what you mean to convey? If it is, the b sign is redundant since the lowered (flat) 7th (a V chord with a dominant 7) is already implied. Writing b7 as part of a dominant chord is redundant and not needed.

    Or are you trying to convey that it is a five chord which is lowered and with a 7th added, e.g. bV(7). bV(7) is a dominant-type V chord lowered one half step.

    Or do you mean it is a V7 chord with a flatted fifth which would be notated V7(b5)?

    You read chord notation (usually) left to right. So...

    Vb7 = dominant type V chord with a lowered 7th. Five / flat7
    - - (ambiguous notation and not recommended)
    bV (7) = dominant type V chord. Lowered V chord with a dominant 7.
    V7 b5) = dominant type V chord with a lowered 7th.
     

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