have you ever vastly improved in short time?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by TrumpetMonk, Aug 17, 2009.

  1. TrumpetMonk

    TrumpetMonk Pianissimo User

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    I'm not askin how, I was just wondering if anyone had ever had a growth in playing in, say less than a month. Not just a good day
     
  2. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Yes, followed shortly thereafter by a dramatic period of depression caused by underestimating my true abilities during a concert.

    During the first couple of years of serious practice, fairly dramatic changes are possible. After a while we have the basics covered, and any improvements are due to hard work which is not a short term phenomenon.

    If you have an audition with Arbans Carnival of Venice next month, but can't really double or triple tongue today, I would not wait for a miracle. That will not happen.

    That is a general rule for life. Miracles are earned, not stumbled upon. Fine playing is based on habits that are acquired with THOUSANDS of repetitions. THAT is the secret for true improvement. Those playing qualities are measured in months, years, decades not in minutes days or weeks.
     
  3. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    Yes.
    While I totally agree with Rowuk, "don't wait for miracles, miracles are earned"
    In the process of earning miracles, I think many people experience great growth spurts throughout their life time.
    My experience has been that I'll discover something that quickly changes the fundimental way I do something but it is always followed by a leveling off. I think it takes a while for my brain to appriciate what I've discovered.
     
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2009
  4. Al Innella

    Al Innella Forte User

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    Sometimes it takes a while for certain things to click, but when they do, it may seem like it was all of a sudden , it's funny the harder you work the more of a natural talent you become.
     
  5. Trumpetman67

    Trumpetman67 Piano User

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    Al Innella is right! I actually took a break from trumpet after school let out. Then when marching band season started, it was tough. After two straight weeks of that I was able to hit the D above the high C for once and hold it for 16 counts! I have never done that before!!!
     
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2009
  6. TrumpetMonk

    TrumpetMonk Pianissimo User

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    Jul 22, 2009
    West virginia
    Lol, I agree with you, i was just wondering. Haha, my band director wants to end our marching band show on a high note, and she tells me she needs me to expand my range by a perfect fifth in a month. Lol, I'll do my best, really. But it just got my thinking
     
  7. uvagrad90

    uvagrad90 New Friend

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    All my progress has been half-vast.

    Sorry, couldnt resist.
    Mike
     
  8. Brekelefuw

    Brekelefuw Fortissimo User

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    There are two distinct times in my playing where this happened.
    The first was in university when I finally realized how poor flexibilities I had. I practiced them daily for 6 months and my playing drastically improved. All of a sudden I could play things that I found really tough before, all because my tongue coordination was better.

    I am currently noticing a huge spike in my range, but I don't know if it is something that has come about due to playing differently or if it is from practicing more. It is not musical sounding, and I wouldn't go use this range at a gig until it is solid, but something is happening in my brain and in my mouth that is making the notes come out.
     
  9. Mamba21500

    Mamba21500 Piano User

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    I had one of those times, it started about a year ago, and is still going, ever since i dropped grades I've been learning a lot quicker then with them. For example, I can now double and triple tongue, which I would not have needed for another few years in grades. A year ago I struggled with A above the staff, and now E above the staff is getting there.

    I find that pretending your horn is better then it is when you play it helps, instead of thinking: I'm playing a tr 300, think your playing a strad, it gives you a nice boost... somehow....
     
  10. Brian H. Smout

    Brian H. Smout Piano User

    Hi All,
    I had a dramatic improvement with my trumpet teacher at the very first lesson with him.
    After listening to me play and observing my setup, he asked me for my objectives. I gave one of them as being able to play an "F" above the staff. To my complete surprise he stated that it wouldn't take long. My range at that time was a slightly strained "D" above the staff. At the end of the 2 hour assessment and lesson I was able to hit a very solid sounding "F". We did it through a series of play by ear upwardly ascending intervals all over the horn. If I missed one, we just dropped back a couple before trying again. Now, I wasn't able to suddenly play 2 octave scales the next day. I did learn that I was capable of doing it and that made all the difference. The trumpet teacher was Mr. Alan Ehness of Brandon University and I am eternally grateful for his encouragement.
    If Chris Morrison or Derrick Milton reads this, "Guys, you did the heavy lifting".

    Cheers,

    Brian
     

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