Having trouble breathing correctly

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by mu4leif, Aug 23, 2005.

  1. mu4leif

    mu4leif New Friend

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    Aug 23, 2005
    Does anyone have any suggestions for different excersies to help with breathing properly? Are there any books out there that deal with this? I have a big problem with my lung capacity and I need to learn how to expand it.
    Thanks for the help.
     
  2. Derek Reaban

    Derek Reaban Mezzo Piano User

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    Jun 16, 2005
    Tempe, Arizona
    Over the years I have gathered ideas about breathing from instructors as well as reading lots of books. I summarized much of this information in a post called Really Tense.... You may find some helpful content reading through this link.

    You may also enjoy a post called ITG Conference 2004 – David Krauss. I attended David’s clinic and summarized many of his ideas. Specifically read the sections related to breathing.

    And finally a quote from Manny Laureano about his ideas related to the breathing mechanism:
    Hope this helps.
     
  3. Chris4

    Chris4 Pianissimo User

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    Jul 16, 2005
    The Balanced Embouchure book by Jeff Smiley actually has some really good breathing tips,techniques, and exercises.
     
  4. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    Baltimore/DC
    Oh wow, I can't believe that I'm going to post this.

    I have heard (keep in mind that I have just started to look into the SA book myself, and don't really "know") that the following Claude Gordon books are pretty good for dealing with air and lung capacity for playing brass instruments:

    Claude Gordon Systematic Approach to Daily Practice for Trumpet
    Brass Playing Is No Harder Than Deep Breathing by Claude Gordon

    http://www.claudegordonmusic.com/products.htm

    But, there is bound to be better advice than just listing a couple of books considering some of the talent that cruises this forum.

    What do you say fellas?
     
  5. Chris4

    Chris4 Pianissimo User

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    Jul 16, 2005
    The Systematic Approach to Daily Practice is great for breathing and range.
     
  6. dizforprez

    dizforprez Forte User

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    Nov 2, 2003
    You are alive aren’t you? So you must be breathing correctly :oops:

    Check out the book song and wind. Arnold Jacobs did the most research on this of anyone I know of.
     
  7. eisprl

    eisprl Mezzo Piano User

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    Sep 26, 2004
    Halifax, NS CANADA
    I had problems breathing as well until my teacher presented me with this helpful tool(s). The first one is called the Voldyne. It measures the capacity of your lungs. The other is called the Breath Builder. Basically you blow and suck air in at a rediculus rate to kepe this ping pong ball at the top of the tube. I guess this helps with building lung capacity. (Although I dont know if you can build you lung capacity - but it will help you use your lungs to their fullest potential).

    Giver er' a shot. (It worked for me). The videos help explain.

    Eric S.

    http://windsongpress.com/breathing devices/Use_Devices.htm

    you can also find Arnold Jacobs book here
     
  8. jpellett

    jpellett New Friend

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    Apr 20, 2005
    Atlanta
    Many people who feel like they run out of air quickly don't really have a problem with lung capacity, but instead with tension. A big breath can feel like it is gone quickly if you are working to hard to blow the air out. If you just let the air come out easily you will find that your breaths last much longer. I delve deeper into breathing on my website. Make sure to follow the link at the end of the Breathing section to a great series of breathing excercises, which I think is what you were originally after.

    Jason Pellett
     
  9. Derek Reaban

    Derek Reaban Mezzo Piano User

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    Jun 16, 2005
    Tempe, Arizona
    Patrick,

    You Wrote:
    In addition to what I wrote in the post above, I have to comment on the experience that I had with the CG SA book.

    When I was in High School and College I misapplied the advice in the Claude Gordon books when he said blow out all the air on every exercise (until the stomach shakes). The misapplication of this concept was that I let this technique carry over into all of the music that I played. It got to the point that I literally felt like I was suffocating when I would play long phrases that required MANY relaxed breaths to make it through the entire passage (especially Charlier and Arban Characteristic Studies), because I literally couldn’t take in a relaxed, filling breath.

    I looked at the SA book this evening to refresh my memory. Part I of each of the lessons have between 13 – 25 long tone exercises. His first rule related to the exercises is to rest as much as you play and then he mentions that “it is essential that you practice these routines in the prescribed mannerâ€. When I played these I would run out of air after 15-25 seconds (and then adhere to his advice to “hold the last note as long as you have air and longerâ€). So, I would spend the better part on an hour on Part I (resting 30 seconds or so after each long note).

    I don’t know about you, but close to an hour of expelling all of my air, led to a tremendous amount of tension in my playing. I didn’t spend 3 plus hours a day practicing to balance out these exercises, so expelling all of my air out on these long tones made up the majority of my practice day. No wonder I developed breathing issues!

    I would highly recommend that if you do spend time with these exercises you carefully balance the amount of time that you “breathe normallyâ€. To his credit, there is one mention in the front of the SA book that says, “Never let your air supply get below half-way. Always keep filling up.†I wish that would have been printed on every page of the exercises instead of expel all of your air on each note!

    My point is while there may be tangible benefits to these exercises, there are also some very real consequences if applied during actual music making. Balance your playing day (limit these exercises to say 5-10 percent of your practice day), and NEVER play below half-way on a breath of air when playing music!

    Just a friendly caution from my experience.
     
  10. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    You know, tension is a real killer when it comes to playing instruments, and even singing.

    Just last night, I made an interesting observation and it made me think about this thread. I don't want to stray too far off of the topic here, but I think that what I'm about to say is somewhat related.

    As you guys know, I play trumpet and sing in a cover band that plays weddings, corporate events and other engagements both public and private. Well, this upcoming weekend, the band got a request for some CSN(Y) and I'm slated to sing lead on "Southern Cross". So, to get the tune back in my head and to try and lean some of Crosby's nuances, I have been working on this tune during my drive to and from work. Also, let it be said that some of this tune is toward the top of my vocal range, not to mention that due to the fact that they did it in such an understated way, it takes a lot of control and I have been having just a bit of difficulty maintaining control on some of the higher parts.

    Anyway, I also had Taekwondo practice last night and as I was driving home, very relaxed post workout, singing this song was nearly effortless and the only thing that I could think that would have made it that way was that I was a lot more relaxed.

    I don't know if that is completely relevant to the conversation at hand, but I think it does relate somewhat and I thought I would share it.
     

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