Heat and tuning

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by [email protected], Jun 24, 2010.

  1. leon_beckenham@hotmail.co

    [email protected] New Friend

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    Nov 18, 2007
    Hey all, I have a question regarding how the trumpet tuning changes with heat. I play in a lot of very hot clubs and, contrary to what I have read and the laws of physics, I seem to go sharp. Any ideas what is going on?

    Thanks
     
  2. Wildman

    Wildman Pianissimo User

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    Jun 23, 2005
    Heat causes the pitch to rise on brass instruments.
     
  3. leon_beckenham@hotmail.co

    [email protected] New Friend

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    Nov 18, 2007
    i thought so! just goes to show how much misinformation there is online....

    How to Tune a Trumpet | eHow.com
    "Know the general effects weather has on a trumpet's ability to stay in tune. Hot weather will cause the metal to expand slightly, and the pitch will flat, while cold weather causes problems with playing sharp, due both to your trumpet's tuning and your technique. Make sure to adapt accordingly."

    cheers buddy
    Read more: How to Tune a Trumpet | eHow.com How to Tune a Trumpet | eHow.com
     
  4. beautgrainger147

    beautgrainger147 Pianissimo User

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    Aug 6, 2009
    Rotherham
    out of interest, why does it get sharp?
    - I had expected that a warmer instrument would be longer and hence flatter
     
  5. amzi

    amzi Forte User

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    Feb 18, 2010
    Northern California
    Are you sure that you're getting sharp? Or at the people you play with getting flat? Cold horns play sharp--at least they did 50 years ago, and I'm not sure that anything has changed in the intervening years.

    You're blowing 99 degree air through your horn, the metal of your horn is at a relatively stable temperature in the mid to upper 90s. Guitars, Bass and Piano strings are all at room temperature. As the ambient air temperature rises those strings get longer, their tuning goes a little flat and you sound sharp. It's not particularly noticeable on a piano unless there are really big temperature swings, but if you'll notice guitar players are always tweaking their tuning--that's because their strings are expanding and contracting and the solid strings do so at a different rate than the wound strings.
     
  6. amzi

    amzi Forte User

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    Feb 18, 2010
    Northern California
    Pardon the error.
     
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2010

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