Heavy bracing on a trumpet

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by ♠♥CORNET♣♦, Mar 15, 2015.

  1. ♠♥CORNET♣♦

    ♠♥CORNET♣♦ Pianissimo User

    214
    30
    Oct 18, 2014
    New Jersey
    I am looking to upgrade my trumpet to a professional /Intermediate trumpet. When I was looking through the trumpets I found that some have heavy bracing on the tuning slide and the bell crook. For example Getzen Genesis 3003. What does that do to the trumpet? It sure does look cool but will it affect tone or darken the sound? Thank you for your replies
     
  2. Alrocks

    Alrocks New Friend

    24
    19
    Jan 22, 2015
    Devon, UK
    Until someone with more knowledge comes along to answer this, I'll chip in with what I know (or think I know). Bracing changes the resonant character of the instrument and tunes the tone. A lot of musical instruments have bracing e.g. guitars, violins etc. A violin has a sound post that transmits the resonance from the bottom of the bridge to the back surface of the violin in order to amplify the sound.

    I imagine the bracing on a trumpet is mostly used to suppress particular frequency ranges. So a trumpet with more bracing will probably sound warmer, less brittle and less fizz. The raw sound of a trumpet contains many frequencies per note. So bracing can help to balance those frequencies, thus tune the tone. And different braces and different locations will tune the tone in different ranges.

    The only way to really hear the effect is to try some out. Now I'll just sit back and wait for the experts to come along and tell me I am completely wrong :)
     
  3. gordonfurr1

    gordonfurr1 Forte User

    2,107
    1,091
    Aug 2, 2010
    North Carolina
    Awww. Good points. Having stayed in a Holiday Inn Express last night (and having watched Jason Harrelson' s video on SWE (standing wave efficiency)) Jason's bracing is theoretically placed to strengthen thin stretched tubing where anti-nodes occur, minimizing energy loss and thereby improving efficiency. Technically true, but to my mind, anti-nodes occur at a number of different places depending on the note...so where to optimize? Well, the most obvious places ARE the outside of bows...there the metal is thinner.
     
  4. SAS

    SAS Pianissimo User

    154
    57
    Jan 7, 2015
    Just buy a new horn.
     
  5. Culbe

    Culbe Forte User

    1,170
    425
    Jul 25, 2014
    Normal
    Short answer, sort of. The bracing dampens vibrations, and produces in a (overall) darker tone. This is how I have understood it.
     
  6. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    61
    16,611
    7,955
    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    Bracing has multiple purposes. In certain places it serves to transmit vibrations to another part of the horn (front and back bell brace for instance). Other braces serve to damp vibrations (between the bell and the valve block for instance).

    At the end of the day, bracing controls the feedback that the instrument gives us (how we hear ourselves) and thus also changes the tone/stability of playing.

    Unbalancing a horn by changing the bracing usually means that we trash the playability. In the case of 2 Monettes that I own/have owned, the heavier braced Ajna2 was MUCH more brilliant than the lighter braced Prana 3. The heavier braced horn is harder to hear and that means for players without incredibly stable playing, it is harder to balance in a section.

    I am very careful about addressing Jason Harrelsons SWE approach. I think that the ad copy is very WRONG and that his math can not produce the results that are claimed. This does not make the horn bad, it just means that the story was created to explain given results instead of a process creating specific results. His heavier horns are more resonant, that is good for a strong player and not so good for a weaker player. The heavier Monette horns are also not optimal for weaker players as they do not have the strength to deal with the more powerful resonance/higher efficiency.

    In your case, you can't predict what a sheet brace would do. My guess is that the instrument would be out of tune and play very unevenly, probably with a rough upper octave,
     
  7. Culbe

    Culbe Forte User

    1,170
    425
    Jul 25, 2014
    Normal
    I think he is talking about buying a horn with sheet bracing, and wondering the effects of the bracing.
     
  8. flugelgirl

    flugelgirl Forte User

    1,322
    798
    Jan 20, 2008
    Seattle, WA
    The most important factor is always going to be if the horn fits you, and the type of playing you do. I've trialed some heavier horns, and while I found that they played well for me, I also found that the weight of some of them was just too much for my body to deal with. I'm small, and not as strong as when I was younger, and the weight of the horn x hours of playing per day left me with an aching back. I chose a more standard weight horn, and it was a better match. I can play more in a day and not end the day with arms shaking and back aching!
     
  9. gordonfurr1

    gordonfurr1 Forte User

    2,107
    1,091
    Aug 2, 2010
    North Carolina
    I figured Jason's video was 80% marketing spin. Sounded impressive, but once I looked at a graph of the HUNDREDS of antinodal points I realize there wasn't much that can be done across such a complex array.
     
  10. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    61
    16,611
    7,955
    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    We have to give Jason credit however. His SWE horns work, even if I don't agree with the ad copy. They sound great, play securely and need less playing energy but more body use to support the weight.

    Pimping a horn not designed heavy with sheet bracing will not make it better. If the artisan changes EVERYTHING that is necessary, it could work, but then you have spent as much as a properly designed instrument would cost.
     

Share This Page