Heavy Valve Caps

Discussion in 'Mouthpieces / Mutes / Other' started by dHoff, Feb 18, 2004.

  1. dHoff

    dHoff Pianissimo User

    72
    6
    Feb 13, 2004
    Woodstock, NY
    I have this horn I just picked up, a modern "French Besson" and it came with a set of heavy valve caps as well as the originals. What are they supposed to do? I do notice a difference but I'm wondering what experience others have with these.
    -dH
     
  2. dcstep

    dcstep Mezzo Piano User

    684
    3
    Nov 27, 2003
    Denver
    Generally, as you add heavier caps (start with the third valve) the slotting will become more secure, but stiffer and less responsive. The tonal focus will increase slightly also. To really feel the difference it's best to have lived with the horn a while (a few days), then start experimenting with the heavy caps.

    On my horn, I've ended up with just one on the third valve casing. Any more and the response gets too sluggish and deliberate for my taste. It's not, "one's good so three will be great", but it might be. It all depends on the horn, the caps and your playing.

    Dave
     
  3. bent trumpet

    bent trumpet New Friend

    8
    0
    Dec 6, 2003
    I don't know which catagory to ask this question, but here it goes. There is a trumpet player in the band that plays for the David Letterman show. The guy has a strange grip with his left hand. It looks like there is something coming off the bottom of his valves that he is holding onto. Has anyone noticed this? What is it?
     
  4. dcstep

    dcstep Mezzo Piano User

    684
    3
    Nov 27, 2003
    Denver
    That's Alan Chez. I think he's playing a Wild Thing lately, so it's either that or some other horn with heavy (long) caps on the bottom.

    Dave
     
  5. Jazzman

    Jazzman Pianissimo User

    67
    0
    Dec 16, 2003
    Yup, that is Alaz Chez with his Wild Thing and custom made Curry heavy caps..... 8)
     
  6. CJDJazzTpt

    CJDJazzTpt Pianissimo User

    91
    1
    May 31, 2004
    New Orleans, LA
    Al Chez is a big fan of playing with no pressure. That grip that he uses to hold his trumpet is to ensure that no pressure is added with his left hand. He uses Wild Thing trumpets and flugels with the 'standard' bottom caps. His grip just makes it look like he is holding something.
     
  7. nowherenearadouble

    nowherenearadouble Pianissimo User

    68
    0
    Nov 12, 2003
    Scotland
    I tried them on several horns and the only one that really worked for me was a Smith Watkins cornet. I tried them on a Wild Thing and a Callet Superchops and for me they really didnt work well on these 2 horns. Made the horns (esp the Callet) VERY sluggish.
    Try them though, you will notice a difference. It might not be for the best though.
    Alan
     
  8. dcstep

    dcstep Mezzo Piano User

    684
    3
    Nov 27, 2003
    Denver
    I'm sure that Alan tried them in a number of possible combinations. For instance, I only use one on my third valve, since any more than that is too sluggish for my taste. This is going to vary from horn to horn, but one on the third valve will tend to have more impact than one on the 1st valve.

    Just don't assume it's an all or nothing proposition. Try a variety of combinations. Experiment.

    Dave
     
  9. nowherenearadouble

    nowherenearadouble Pianissimo User

    68
    0
    Nov 12, 2003
    Scotland
    Dave,
    I did try alot of combinations. The cornet ended up using all 3. They were not the heaviest ones I have though. The cornet did have a problem in the slots and the caps seemed to help this.
    I spoke with Tom Turner about the WT caps though and he said the trumpet didnt need them.
    I play Lawlers now and would like to try caps on them, although the slotting does seem better on the Lawlers anyway
    I believe they do have a place on the "things to try" list.
    Has anyone tried them on a flugel?
    Alan
     
  10. dcstep

    dcstep Mezzo Piano User

    684
    3
    Nov 27, 2003
    Denver
    This may be true (and likely is in general), but the mpc you use and the main slide you use can have an impact on your opinion. Adding a cap to the third valve can be a lot like adding a brace to the main slide. (In general, focus increases and the slotting becomes more "stable"). So if you've got a slide that makes the horn a touch "slippery", then one or two caps may get you right where you want to be.

    Dave
     

Share This Page