Heeeelp

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by harezichi, Dec 30, 2007.

  1. Patric_Bernard

    Patric_Bernard Forte User

    1,951
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    Oct 25, 2007
    California
    You are greatly GREATLY mistaken. A teacher can teach you things that you cant even imagine. Getting your chops right, is veryVERY important. Getting your notes down is important too. Working on finger dexterity is important. Being able to play pieces is one thing, but being able to play extreamly well all the time and know how and what you did is another... and the right thing. Get a teacher.
     
  2. trpt2345

    trpt2345 Mezzo Forte User

    858
    4
    May 21, 2006
    Morelia, Mexico
    You do need a teacher. It's not just about reading notes, it's about playing efficiently and not developing bad habits. About getting routines in place that will lead you on a path to get you where you want to go. The trumpet has been around for a long time and there have been lots of really smart people who have figured out the best and most efficient ways to play. Take advantage of that knowledge. Get a teacher.

    Michael McLaughlin
     
  3. Patric_Bernard

    Patric_Bernard Forte User

    1,951
    1
    Oct 25, 2007
    California

    I definatly wish I had the chance to get a teacher. Its taken me the 5 years i've been playing to finally understand the concept of no pressure. and it took me about 3 years to understand slowly first, faster later. Teachers will definatly benifit you. But not getting one when you have the chance is just being stuborn. Trying to prove to the world that you can do it all by your self, when really, everybody needs help sometimes.
     
  4. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    Andrew,
    if you have worked out an optimal "practice mute routine" you can develop everything except sound quality.
    I disagree with the concept of "face time". Being a serious musician means making music or developing skills to make better music. Both CAN be fun and that is what separates the successful from the get-by-ers.
     
  5. brem

    brem Mezzo Forte User

    831
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    Sep 13, 2007
    Quebec City, QC, Canada
    Rowuk: not everybody is a so-called "serious musician". :)
    And practicing with a mute does not mean that tone and colour will suffer, it only means that's not what the player will practice when using the mute.

    If we give advice to people to use "what works" when we are talking about mouthpieces, why not use the same rationale when talking about mutes?

    Besides, if he didn't use a mute, a "serious musician" couldn't possibly have kids. Can you imagine playing trumpet at 8pm with a newborn? :)

    If ends justifies means, environment dictates it. Or anyway, narrows the possibilities. :)
     
  6. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
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    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    Brem,
    good points. I still think it is important for the non serious trumpet player to not get into the habit of "face time"! If I am not in the mood, I will play easy tunes (like Concone or even our Hymnbook) and still try to make music. Face time to me is like reading a magazine while playing long tones - this defeats the purpose of playing long tones in the first place. A couple of tunes would be MUCH more productive!

    The mute does work - for everything except tone quality. I survived with a SilentBrass when my last 2 kids (18 months apart) were small (I have 4). After a week of practice mute, I had a gig and noticed that my sound was MUCH worse. During that time, I developed my practice mute routine that I still use on the road today.

    I like your comparison with the mouthpiece. I am sure that there are plenty of opportunities to "create" a more perfect practice mute. At present, $500 will get you about every practice mute ever built. We can sink a whole lot more into mouthpieces! Maybe even better would be a practice trumpet, designed WITH a built in mute and optimised resistance (maybe a modified pocket trumpet?). Felix, are you listening?
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2008
  7. jazz9

    jazz9 Piano User

    357
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    Dec 5, 2007
    Chilhowie, VA
    During that time, I developed my practice mute routine that I still use on the road today.- rowuk

    What sort of practice mute routine is it? I have the Silent Brass, and it seems to work well, but sometimes I feel like it hurts me. What do you do, alternate between mute and no mute?
     
  8. brem

    brem Mezzo Forte User

    831
    5
    Sep 13, 2007
    Quebec City, QC, Canada
    What we need is a miced mute that attaches on the outside of the bell, and has a speaker that nullifies the sound as we play.

    sweet jayzuss.
     
  9. ccNochops

    ccNochops Piano User

    260
    8
    Sep 30, 2006
    White Marsh, VA
    I say, play the lick & let them fuss..........they'll get over it eventually. Ain't nothing sweeter than a hot trumpet lick at 5 AM... :cool:
     
  10. harezichi

    harezichi New Friend

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    Aug 7, 2007
    i got my best brass mute today and WOWOWOWOW. there mis literally NO resistance and its almost completely silent to everybody but me! At first I was skeptical because there is a hole int he end of it that I thought sound would come out of but its amazing. Thank you trentausten! this mute is amazing and tiny.

    as for all of the teacher hype i do agree a teacher could help me in multiple ways but I play on my own schedule and i follow my own practice ruitine and its helped me so much so far. I bought one of those giant books with all the music in it from my church just for fun and i can play it all. I also made my new years resolution just to give my soul to the trumpet so i should be getting amazing soon
     

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