Help! I need to hit B above the staff in 2 wks

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by horatiodante, Aug 6, 2010.

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  1. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    Tell your wife that the Megan Fox photo is just a pale comparison to play to when she's not around.
    rowuk's trumpet? Bundy (Deluxe) I think.
    ---seriously, try this out. You'll thank me.
     
  2. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    No, it's a Chinese copy of a Bundy. ;-)
     
  3. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    Thanks for the clarification.
     
  4. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    Re: Whoah!!! Guys and gals...I ignited a firestorm, I'm sorry

    The warm-up exercises I mentioned have a range builder as the last exercise. I can hit F# (above high C) on an Ambassador (a $50 horn). It only costs $3 !! You didn't start the firestorm, ignorance did.
     
  5. RichJ

    RichJ Piano User

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    Brandi, in all of the back and forth in this thread about hitting high notes, I think the fact that you are auditioning for a community band has been lost. It appears from the website that the band prides itself on being particularly high quality for a community band. What makes a concert band sound good is first and foremost good tone quality and consistent intonation through the sections. Unless you are aiming to play first trumpet (which seems clearly not to be the case based on your range limitations), I think the conductor would be most receptive to hearing a warm sound and good intonation, and would not be particularly concerned about the high B. I think the worst thing you could do would be to compromise your tone and pitch with a shallow mouthpiece aimed at facilitating the upper register, just to get the highest notes in the audition piece. I would guess that many musicians get accepted to this group without playing the designated piece perfectly. Usually, in amateur and student ensembles, the designated pieces are intended to stretch people so that the conductor can see the limitations of your playing, so as to make seating assignments, etc. In other words, don't sweat a couple notes and miss the big picture. Put your focus on playing a musically pleasing performance and you'll be putting your best foot forward. Good luck!
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2010
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  6. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    Re: Whoah!!! Guys and gals...I ignited a firestorm, I'm sorry

    horatiodante sez:
    Btw, I'm a chick and I think a nice picture of Jeffrey Donovan on my music stand will definitely help me sing through my horn.
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    People think its smoke and mirrors but what a great way to put passion in the music.
    What's music without passion? Noise I guess.
    What do male birds do to attract a mate? sing!
    In fact, a lot of animals sing as a way to attract the opposite sex.
    I've seen the group Chicago more times than I can remember. However, the best I've ever heard them was when they played at the Playboy mansion. They sounded like men possessed.
    Yes! definately put Jeff's picture on your stand (or somewhere you can see it when you play, and see how well it works.
    Gosh, when a person thinks about it, how can it not work.
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2010
  7. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    No mouthpiece will give you better chops. ONLY practice will do that. The key words in your post are "marketing brochure". Sounds like you didn't like it. Reminds me of the guy in New York who asked someone how to get to Carnegie Hall. The response was "practice, practice, practice".
     
  8. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Boy, has this thread gotten out of hand.

    We have gone full circle and the real message for the original poster is not even available here in minute concentration.

    When someones range just stops at a specific note, the problem is PRESSURE not size of mouthpiece. The chops get squeezed off and stop producing sound.
    When that player starts removing pressure, the first thing that they lose is RANGE because the chops are not getting the mechanical help that they are dependent on.

    I teach an evolutionary approach, we do NOT remove pressure first, we improve body use and breathing then start working on reducing the pressure bit by bit. That way the player generally stays functional throughout the whole process.

    Switching mouthpieces does NOT remove the pressure just like new tires on an automobile do not increase the boost from the turbocharger. When weak players DO change mouthpieces, another effect comes into play: the reorganization of the fine motor behavior of the face muscles to adapt to the new piec. That generally takes a big hit in EVERY aspect of playing.

    There is NOT an optimal piece for any embouchure. It is really a combination of the geometry of the face, preference for amount of grip, efficiency and intonation with the horn and plain old practice to accustomize the face to the hardware.

    The idea for a weaker player that RANGE can be positively influenced by just changing a mouthpiece is HOGWASH. Any mouthpiece is going to require work for us to get musical results. In two weeks, (2 months, perhaps 2 years) it makes more sense to look in the mirror and solve the SOFTWARE problem than creating new ones with HARDWARE. Once the face is together, we have a great amount of options, as those who have been there will tell you range being the least of the advantages.

    For those interested, I own 14 instruments and play them all regularly enough to not have to associate myself with one manufacturer. I own and play Monette, Bach, Selmer, M├╝nkwitz, Enders, the East German predecessor to B+S, my own personal custom picc, Holton, Wagner and a couple of others where no one will recognize the artisan. I do believe in the right equipment for the job which strictly involves the sound. I play baroque music on the nat and picc with modern and hysterically correct ensembles, german symphonic music with rotary valved instruments, other music suited for the piston trumpet with the Monette, Bach and Selmer.

    The common denominator is ME looking in the mirror and having MY face together so that the hardware only becomes the sonic interface between my brain and the audiences ears. I'd have it no other way! With all of my hardware, range is consistent regardless of mouthpiece and horn. Endurance and expression are dependent on me matching the environment. I can play Handels Fireworks music in D major or the Brandenburg Concerto #2 on the standard Bb trumpet. I am sure that is not what most people would expect or want. I could also play a big band gig on the picc, that would also be misplaced.

    Let's either try and keep this serious, or at worst, poke some honest fun at the general tone. I think the original poster probably lost us or ignored us when the name calling started.
     
  9. lmf

    lmf Forte User

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    Re: Whoah!!! Guys and gals...I ignited a firestorm, I'm sorry

     
  10. SmoothOperator

    SmoothOperator Mezzo Forte User

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    Did someone say practicing ultra quietly?
     
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