Help with Claude Gordon method please?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Shunt, Oct 17, 2013.

  1. Shunt

    Shunt New Friend

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    Mar 11, 2011
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    Hi there. I earn my living playing the trumpet, but in a different capacity than previously. I used to work in symphony orchestras, then had a few years working away from music. Now I'm back, but my playing work nowadays is mostly dance band/swing band/big band/theatre stuff. I never had a great high register (up to E/F above top C) but never needed any more than this in the classical world so I concentrated on other aspects of my playing, rather than making a serious effort to improve it. Now of course this is simply not good enough for my current work, so I need to do something about it! A couple of friends and colleagues have highly recommended Claude Gordon's methods (which I have somehow never come across previously), so I have bought "Brass Playing is no Harder then Deep Breathing", "A Physical Approach to Elementary Brass Playing", and "A Systematic Approach to Daily Practice". I have 2 questions about the "Systematic Approach" book: 1) He recommends staying with each "Lesson" for at least a week: is this appropriate in my case, or would it be more beneficial to move through them a little quicker? 2) in the later "Lessons" he incorporates Clarke studies, Walter Smith, and Satin-Jacome. Is the idea that this is all the practice you should do every day and no more, as there are other things I normally like to do as well if I have time (Clarke's Setting-up Drills, Colin flexibilities, Maggio, Thibaud, Arban, etc.) Any thoughts much appreciated...[HR][/HR]1. 1 1
     
  2. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Welcome to TM, Shunt!

    Claude Gordon's material is best studied with a person that studied under Claude, but a smart trumpet player can make it work to their advantage. I really like the range studies at the beginning of Smith's Top Tones for the Trumpeter. The etudes are (in my opinion [no IMHO with me...sorry]) Arban taken up a notch.

    When working for high notes on the cheap, transpose Arban up an octave. Fun stuff!
     
  3. Shunt

    Shunt New Friend

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    Thanks VB, I'd forgotten about Smith's Top Tones.

    Any other thoughts from people?
     
  4. gbshelbymi

    gbshelbymi Mezzo Piano User

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    I might also suggest checking out the following: Power Legit Trumpet Studies

    I studied with the author back in my college days. Gordon Stump is retired now, but was a great teacher and an even better player. His method really helped my range and endurance.
     
  5. Shunt

    Shunt New Friend

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    Thanks Greg
     
  6. Ed Kennedy

    Ed Kennedy Forte User

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    Maybe you can get some SKYP lessons with a Gordon devotee.
     
  7. Ed Kennedy

    Ed Kennedy Forte User

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    Try www.purtle.com He maintains a list of former Gordon students and teaches on-line (Skype?)
     
  8. Shunt

    Shunt New Friend

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    thanks Ed, will have a look at that. any Claude Gordon students or guys who have had lessons with Gordon students?
     
  9. cfkid

    cfkid Pianissimo User

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    I've been taking lessons with Bruce Haag, a 14 year direct student of Claude Gordon. I'd highly recommend him. He played with Stan Kenton, Elvis, and several others for years. He offers lessons via Skype. As for Systematic Approach, I take two weeks for each lesson. During those two weeks, I'll work part I and II of the SA lesson, one or two lessons from Daily Trumpet Routines, an entire Clarke Technical study with etude, and then some etudes and or jazz studies.

    I'm a comeback player, after taking 20+ years off the horn. CG's approach has really helped me, but be warned it is NOT a quick process. You'll likely need to learn to tongue in an all new way (Modified K-Tongue). However, I've found it much easier and cleaner. Also, due to the fact that I practice the Clarke studies in four different modes (one week each of single, K, double tongue and a week of slurred) I've made great strides in my articulation. Range, tongue arch, etc. come slower but I do see progress.

    Mark

    P.S. - you can find Bruce at http://www.brucehaag.com
     
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2013
  10. Shunt

    Shunt New Friend

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    Great, thank you Mark :)
     

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