Help with low notes.

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Trumpetguardgirl, Jan 27, 2015.

  1. trumpetsplus

    trumpetsplus Fortissimo User

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    Let's wait for the OP to clarify this. There have been several suggestions but nothing back from Trumpetguardgirl.

    I would suspect that Rowuks circle of breath would be a good start - but we have no idea of the OP's playing history.
     
  2. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    If you want to improve you low notes, then work on low notes. There really is no secret, trick or special technique that is going to do it for you. Just get in the practice room and work them with long tones, keeping in mind to avoid bad habits such as using too much mouthpiece pressure, and make sure you do a good job of breathing. I can virtually guarantee that if you work at them in a systematic, structured way, and you do it every day, they will probably come around faster than you think.

    No matter how much knowledge you might have about doing a certain task, the only way you will ever really make strides of improvement is by doing it.
     
  3. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Low notes are actually more of a challenge then high notes. First piece of advice is to relax the embouchure as much as possible. You will need to use a large volume of air so adequate breath support becomes paramount. Then try working down to the lower range with long tone slurs starting on a range you are comfortable with playing. You will find as you get lower and lower on the long tone slurs, you will be finding that you are running low on air much quicker as you work the range down. This is physiology (and God) telling you that more breath support is required.

    Oh yeah, then there is the Rowuk circle of breathing thingy.
     
  4. trumpetsplus

    trumpetsplus Fortissimo User

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    Only if there are no playing aspects which is not being addressed. Otherwise you are reinforcing bad habits.

    The other day I had a student with difficulty in the lower register THAT HE WAS NOT AWARE OF. Addressing TMJ issues improved the low register dramatically. If we had continued without considering this possibility he would have well and truly reinforced this bad habit.
     
  5. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Try practicing immediately after a 20 minute hot shower. If things work better, you have a body tension issue. There are other things to try, but this is by far the easiest.

    Low notes generally are hard when you have a crappy practice routine. You need tons more soft long tones - for the rest of your life!
     
  6. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    See. Relaxation. The key to treating TMJ is relaxing the jaw. Eating soft foods, and playing long tones. BUT eating soft foods while playing long tones:think: NOT a good idea:noway:
     
  7. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Heat is also a great way to relax muscle, and attitude.
     
  8. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    You're picking gnat turds out of pepper by illustrating a single, special case. The average player is not going to have those roadblocks, and will often benefit from an additional 15 extra minutes of insightful practice every day. You can't just blunder your way through - you have to pay attention to what's going on between you and the horn. It's the quickest and best way to identify what is hindering you and make the incremental changes that are going to help, and it gives the player a much greater understanding about what works, what doesn't, and why - it's much more meaningful than simply being told by a teacher, "do this," and I fully believe that a player who is self-aware can go a long way toward diagnosing and fixing a lot their own problems when it comes to playing - at least where the basics of the horn are concerned.
     
  9. gordonfurr1

    gordonfurr1 Forte User

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    And make the experience smell better for the teacher.
     
  10. therealnod

    therealnod Pianissimo User

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    You know, I agree with this a lot, but there is this one thing...you have to consider the players' level of experience and talent. A really talented player won't need as much experience and an experienced player will not need as much talent.
     

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