Help with Shakes...

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by motteatoj, Jul 9, 2014.

  1. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    You can also move your lower jaw up and down with your lips -- this helps to make it more effective
     
  2. motteatoj

    motteatoj Mezzo Forte User

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    I do, my instructor does, he gives me tips, I know it will come with the old "practice and time", just want more exercises...that one page in Arbans got old long ago
     
  3. strad116055

    strad116055 Pianissimo User

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    jake (don jacoby) said that shakes are a "loud, lousy lip trill." he recommended starting on Ab above the staff (2 and 3) to learn. you want to shake upwards to the Bb. both of those notes will be in tune and they're close enough together to make it an easy place to do it. the lower shakes are actually a little bit harder. you don't have to violently shake the horn. its more of an exaggerated hand vibrato. it also helps if you slightly overblow the main note. once you start, you have to keep the air moving fast. it is strenuous, so go a little at a time at first.
     
  4. jiarby

    jiarby Fortissimo User

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    listen to the end of "Handbags and Gladrags"...
     
  5. strad116055

    strad116055 Pianissimo User

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    like any musical ornamentation, the type of shake used varies with the stye of the music. the OP mentioned armstrong, who ornamented his playing in a melodic soloististic, way. the shakes were kind of exaggerated vibrato. the swing era bands did their shakes in a very disciplined way, matching the width and the speed to the lead trumpet througout the brass section. they tended to be fast, and rather tight. once again, almost an extension of the vibrato, which was also perfectly matched down the section. if you're going to listen to bill chase, and i hope you are, check out an album called woody's winners from 1965, or any of the youtubes from around then. the shakes are much wider, but still matched throughout the band, altho much looser than say, harry james' band would be. the first trumpet parts are also higher. the partials are closer together, and more slippery. of course you have to be able to play up there. "handbags and gladrags" is an example of the lead trumpet ornamenting his part pretty much alone. the awesome video posted on this thread, where the lead player is ornamenting his part, to the obvious delight of everyone present, is a great example of this also. (god does that look they are having fun or what.) on the same album as "handbags" is "get it on", where the all the trumpets shake together. they match the speed, starting very slowly and then speeding it up and getting wider. the lead part gets the widest. sometimes to match a screamer who's got a very wide shake (especially when he's an octave above you) it helps to half-valve a little bit. then there's maynard, who does that thing where he shakes through all the valve combinations on his indian stuff.
     
  6. motteatoj

    motteatoj Mezzo Forte User

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    you are spot on sir!
    My modern day equivalent to Mr. Armstrong is a great New Orleans trumpeter called Kermit Ruffins...I LOVE his shakes, and his style, he blends Armstrong with some new styles, but really works to preserve the style and music of Louis. He was a founding member of the Rebirth Brass Band, but left to stay more local and to pursue his love of old school trad jazz (mainly armstrong).

    If you have never heard him, here is a good example of his shakes...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4WtmkES0X48

    about 3:05 in gets "shakey"
     
  7. trumpetguy27

    trumpetguy27 Mezzo Piano User

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    \

    Hmmm... must be the kind of horn you play, it doesn't hurt when I do it with my Adams! :cool:
     
  8. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Shakes in the staff can be pretty tough. The trick is to use the fingering for the first note that uses the most valves, play by "aiming" at the halfway point between the two notes and move the trumpet back and forth horizontally using the right hand.

    Works upstairs, too.
     
  9. jiarby

    jiarby Fortissimo User

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    I'd consider those Kermit "shakes" to actually be lip trills.

    If that is what you after then get a Colin Advanced Lip Flexibilities book and start slow... get them EVEN and smooth THEN increase tempo.
     
  10. strad116055

    strad116055 Pianissimo User

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    there's something in the schlossberg hi tones studies for lip trills, too. they start upstairs where the partials tend to be a whole step apart. obviously if you've got a good lip trill doing shakes is going to be a lot easier. forrest buchtel told me when he was playing lead with woody that when the lower parts had shakes written that were actually too low to be effective, they used sloppy valve trills to get the effect of a shake if it happened to match the lead part better. the problem down there is that you have to be strong enough to force the horn to sound in between the slots. if you had to shake on a second line G, for instance, even if you could "trill" between G and C a fourth above fast enough,which you could theortically do if you practiced your arban, it wouldn't be the sound you were after.
     

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