Herbert L. Clarke.................grrrrrrr

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Wlfgng, Sep 13, 2008.

  1. Wlfgng

    Wlfgng Piano User

    Age:
    43
    335
    3
    Aug 15, 2008
    Canada
    Oh how I despise your book of studies right now. It is royaly kicking my butt this evening.

    Grrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr.
     
  2. RobertSlotte

    RobertSlotte Pianissimo User

    236
    3
    Jul 7, 2008
    Finland
    heh, sounds familiar :-P
     
  3. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    61
    16,611
    7,953
    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    Wolfgang,
    if it is kicking your butt, you are letting it. You can enter the win-win state by SLOWING DOWN!

    Clarke was designed to be practiced at slow speeds and perfected before turning the RPMs up.

    My point? You are kicking your own butt. Clarke sounds awesome regardless if it is fast or not - it just has to be CLEAN!
     
  4. cornetguy

    cornetguy Mezzo Forte User

    797
    4
    Sep 12, 2005
    Saint Paul, MN
    I like the book, I do have problems doing some of the the studies (4,5,6,8,) with the repeats in one breath. I don't worry about that, concentrate on clean playing.
     
  5. westview1900

    westview1900 Piano User

    257
    2
    Nov 30, 2005
    I agree with Rowuk. The idea when you learn a new task which you will repetitively perform is to learn it so well that it resides in your subconscious. That can be done by making time slow down. To do this, you must slow down by turning your metronome to the left until you find a tempo where you are relaxed and have a clear head. With time, you will be relaxed at quicker tempos. I have heard that to the greatest athletes time is perceived at a reduced rate compared to the other athletes on the field. I think this is because the greatest have learned their games so well that all of the skills for the basic tasks reside in their subconscious and their mind is freed up to focus on fewer tasks and therefore, they can think more clearly.
     
  6. Wlfgng

    Wlfgng Piano User

    Age:
    43
    335
    3
    Aug 15, 2008
    Canada
    My fingers were going one way, my lips were going the other way and my mind was torn between the two.

    Played the same studies today at the same tempo......it was way better than yesterday back to normal.
     
  7. Bill Dishman

    Bill Dishman Piano User

    285
    60
    Nov 22, 2003
    Gainesville, Florida
    Please go and read "How I Became a Cornetist" by Herbert L. Clarke. There is a wealth of experience in there about many of the issues you brought up.

    Patience, slow tempos, perfection before moving on, professionalism, frustration, nerves etc. ( I could go on and on.)

    It is the most inspiring book I have ever read and I read it at least once every year. It doesn't take long.

    It is especially good when things are going a little rough.

    I use the Clarke Technical Studies every day (numbers 1 -8) as a gauge of how I am progressing. It also shows me where my weaknesses are (both mentally and physically)


    Bill Dishman
    Gainesville, Florida
     
  8. westview1900

    westview1900 Piano User

    257
    2
    Nov 30, 2005
  9. Wlfgng

    Wlfgng Piano User

    Age:
    43
    335
    3
    Aug 15, 2008
    Canada
    Thanks for the informaton on the book, never knew it existed. I'm going to get it. As my playing is progressing Clarke and Arban are becoming more and more my friends(not always though).

    In my younger days I would dismiss both of them as a waste of playing time.........I just never knew better.

    Tonight I took the studies at about 1/3 of the tempo I was playing before, good grief.........now I know what I really need to work on. Thanks for all the tips!
     
  10. trumpetlore

    trumpetlore Pianissimo User

    100
    2
    Apr 14, 2007
    Rochester, NY
    westview,
    Thanks for the link. I'm gonna enjoy reading this during the week.
     

Share This Page