hidden slot?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by ltg_trumpet, Jun 19, 2009.

  1. Sofus

    Sofus Forte User

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    I was more thinking of the volume than the tone quality, actually.


    A true education to read this post of yours! Although I´m quite familiar with
    reflection coefficients, complex impedances etc., I haven´t studied the actual
    trumpet at all.

    I feel I´ve now learned something new! Thanks!

    :thumbsup:
     
  2. R.A.S.

    R.A.S. Pianissimo User

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    Could you guys just speak in plain English/German/Swedish?
    My knowledge of physics exists in the head of a physicist friend of mine, Mike!
     
  3. Sofus

    Sofus Forte User

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    Seems like a LOT of info in there, VB!
    I´m gonna read every detail for sure!

    Thanks!
     
  4. Sofus

    Sofus Forte User

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    Sorry for getting carried away, friend!

    The lowest note that resonates on a Bb-trumpet is [email protected] Hz.
    Therefore you can also play any note that is an evan number of this
    lowest, fundamental note concerning frequency.

    C below staff: 2*116.54 Hz.
    G on first line: 3*116.54 Hz.
    C at top of staff: 4*116.54 Hz.
    E at top of staff: 5*116.54 Hz.
    G above staff: 6*116.54 Hz.
    Bb above first ledger line: 7*116.54 Hz (a bit out of tune though)
    High C: 8*116.54 Hz.
    High D: 9*116.54 Hz.
    High E: 10*116.54 Hz.
    High F#: 11*116.54 Hz (a bit out of tune though)
    High G: 12*116.54 Hz.

    ALL these notes exist in the trumpet FOR REAL, without any valves needed!
     
  5. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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  6. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    R.A.S.
    If you want to play in the same sandbox, you have to learn a little bit of the language. This is actually still very tame:
    You just have to believe me that the bell side of the horn is "closed" (well at least a big percent closed - what we hear is what leaks out....)

    The rest is simple multiplication and division.
    An octave is (roughly) double the frequency.

    The best recipe is just not to worry about it and let the geeks get carried away. That time that we waste, you go and practice, then you get the jobs not us!

    As you for sure realize, math has not made a "better" trumpet. People still have to do that. Many trumpets today have less "problems" due to the ability to calculate more before cutting the metal though. Yamahas legendary consistency combines old world handicraft (their artisans learned here in Germany from a true master) with new age simulation.
     
  7. Al Innella

    Al Innella Forte User

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    It's nothing more than a alternate [false] fingered Bb , the higher you go, more alternate fingerings become available for each note .
     
  8. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    We can think of impedance as being a form of resistance within an oscillating system. In electronics, we generally speak of resistance when talking of direct current applications, (like a battery) and if alternating current, impedance. In acoustics we have what we can call wave impedance and input impedance.

    When a disturbance is set up in some medium and travels to the boundary between it and some other medium, a certain fraction of the disturbance is transmitted into the new medium and the remainder is reflected back into the original medium. If these impedances are very different, there is almost complete reflection, with only a small share of the total energy being sent on. On the other hand, if the two media have wave impedances that are approximately equal, then there is very little reflection and the disturbance is almost completely transmitted across the junction. (Arthur Benade, Fundamentals of Musical Acoustics.)

    Without wave impedance a trumpet could not set up any sort of a stable sounding wave, and, uhh, it wouldn’t sound, feel, or play like a trumpet. Too much, and we could set up real stable standing waves that couldn’t make it into the room. Not good, although perhaps a dream for violists and others who have to sit in front of us.

    This following on input impedance comes out of my own head, and is highly suspect! (Perhaps someone can chime in and correct any of the stuff I get wrong—please!)

    Input impedance has more to do with individual tones, and how much the instrument likes to play them. Input impedance is measured in “Q;” a good trumpet will have a high Q factor for the notes we want to play. If these are lined up correctly, the trumpet plays like a dream; tapers, bell flares and mouthpieces all mess with these impedances, for good or ill, mostly for ill.

    How's that for English?
     
    rowuk likes this.
  9. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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  10. R.A.S.

    R.A.S. Pianissimo User

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    Now, why didn't they make me take more of an education when I got my education?
     

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