high alititude, breathing

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by jcstites, Jun 16, 2005.

  1. jcstites

    jcstites Mezzo Forte User

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    Jun 1, 2005
    Tallahassee, FL
    I am in Aspen right now , just got here 2 days ago. I have noticed that my long phrases are getting hard to get through. The audition here at the festival is on sunday. Are there any breathing exercises I can do to help this?

    Also.. One of the excerpts is shosta 1 , the slow muted slow. I only have a wick straight mute. I wish i owned a trumcor lyric or a montreal mute, but i dont. Should I try and play really soft, play mezzo, or put a crown bag over it? It is really hard to play it soft, especially with the air up here.

    Thanks.
     
  2. Tootsall

    Tootsall Fortissimo User

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    Oct 25, 2003
    Yee HAW!
    Having been to the Colorado mountains I can only say "rest, rest, rest". Your body requires days and weeks at altitude to acclimatize (which consists mostly of improving the oxygen transfer efficiency of your system). It isn't going to happen overnight!

    Quite an experience to start huffing and puffing with the least bit of exercise, isn't it? Must be what smokers have to live with all the time.
     
  3. rjzeller

    rjzeller Forte User

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    Rochester, MN
    First of all -- JC -- good luck!!

    Secondly, I'd be REAL interested in what people have to say about this. I struggle with mild Asthma at times and it would be interesting to see what folks reccomend to overcome such problems. I realize high-altitude breathing isn't entirely the same since your body does acclimate after a time, but I imagine it's similar enough to relate....
     
  4. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    Sep 29, 2004
    USA
    Here, I'm going to be completely useless but I'll chime in because I may have had a unique experience.

    Last year, when I went ITG to help Dave out, I was anxious because of everything I've ever heard about high altitude playing. I got there and was astonished to find that there was no effect on my breathing or playing at all! The only thing I could figure was that I had focused on my breathing for days before and I had plenty in reserve to feel normal. Or perhaps, and better still, since I have less air to begin with and have always focused on being a smart breather, maybe that's what got me through.

    In any case, that's another county heard from.

    ML
     
  5. BigBadWolf

    BigBadWolf Piano User

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    Nov 30, 2004
    Los Angeles, CA
    I remember when I got back from Aspen some years ago, for about a week I had an extra octave. It was a very sad day when my lungs got reacclimated to sea level.
     
  6. Tootsall

    Tootsall Fortissimo User

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    Oct 25, 2003
    Yee HAW!
    Manny, your experience is possibly due to Denver being at 5,280 feet ASL while Aspen (the town) is higher at 8,000 feet. The difference in oxygen content does not appear to be terribly large but when combined with other physiological effects can quite significantly reduce the amount of O2 that is transported by the circulatory system. See Table 3 at http://dr-amy.com/rich/oxygen/ This indicates that there is only about 70% as much oxygen in your lungs that is available for the haemoglobin of the lungs to pick up when at ~ 8,000 Ft. ASL.

    There is quite a discussion on this at http://www.vnh.org/MPHME/1.html#1 .

    I can remember walking from a parking lot up a slight hill to a lookout at ~11,000 ft ASL in Rocky Mountain Park just above the town of Estes Park a few years back. It was.... enlightening! (I live at 3,000 feet and thought I was in good shape!..... HA!) Only 50% of the oxygen availabe "up there". You DO notice it, believe me.

    Edit: BigBad.... stop breathing Helium! :D (J.K.)
     
  7. jcstites

    jcstites Mezzo Forte User

    810
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    Jun 1, 2005
    Tallahassee, FL
    manny, what about this part of my post:

    "Also.. One of the excerpts is shosta 1 , the slow muted slow. I only have a wick straight mute. I wish i owned a trumcor lyric or a montreal mute, but i dont. Should I try and play really soft, play mezzo, or put a crown bag over it? It is really hard to play it soft, especially with the air up here. "

    i really dont know what they would rather hear in an audition.
     
  8. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    USA
    Just play naturally, not too soft. What is important to me is your phrasing and whether you know how to make an intelligent musical line. Yes, it should be soft but not so that it disrupts the flow of what you're doing.

    ML
     
  9. wiseone2

    wiseone2 Artitst in Residence Staff Member

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    Nov 19, 2003
    Brooklyn,NY
    Try it on the D trumpet........(Sorry to butt in)
    Wilmer
     
  10. jcstites

    jcstites Mezzo Forte User

    810
    1
    Jun 1, 2005
    Tallahassee, FL
    i didnt bring the slides for d trumpet. i will try it on Eb in a few minutes.

    edit- just tried it on Eb, it works alot better, but that Bb to Eb transposition wasnt fun!


    it just feels so damn loud on c with the wick.
     

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