high alititude, breathing

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by jcstites, Jun 16, 2005.

  1. Don Herman

    Don Herman New Friend

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    Jun 18, 2005
    Monument, CO, USA
    It takes about ten days for your body to fully acclimate. Red blood cell count increases, and your blood will try to thin out a bit. All this takes more water, so be sure to drink more than you think you need. The (usually very) dry air also dehydrates you worse than normal... Watch for headaches or stomachaches that could indicate a touch of altitude sickness (you'd probably know by now). The most important thing to do is to drink more, and I mean water!

    If your breathing is working right, don't change and you'll be fine. I actually find it easier to play out here than down low (the high humidity is a challenge). Enjoy the mountain views! Drive Independence Pass if you get the chance (closed just a week or two ago -- due to snow!)

    For the mute situation, either borrow one, buy one from a local store, or stuff cotton balls into your straight mute.

    HTH - Don
     
  2. dbacon

    dbacon Mezzo Piano User

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    Oct 24, 2003
    Scottsdale, AZ.
    Used to play gigs at Aspen on weekends, come down to Denver and had loads of capacity! Just relax and take an extra count to inhale, let the air drop to the bottom of the lungs.

    You automatically play higher up there anyway...... :lol:
     
  3. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    Sep 29, 2004
    USA
    Thanks for the tip about the difference between Aspen and Denver. I guess I never really realized that, Toots.

    Hey, David, one little correction: there is no such thing as "the bottom of the lungs" when it comes to airflow. Because of the way the lungs are constructed with bronchial and alveoli branches, the air enters the lungs in a more equalized way than most people, especially wind players and singers, realize. We get fooled abdominal movement due to diaphragmatic contraction but the "water into a bag" analogy isn't true.

    ML
     
  4. jcstites

    jcstites Mezzo Forte User

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    Jun 1, 2005
    Tallahassee, FL

    I have been drinking tons of water. I was getting headaches the first few days, nothing a few aspirin wouldn’t fix. (and beer :lol: )

    We came in on independence pass. Mapquest didn’t tell us it would be scary as hell! My friend was driving my car, I wake up and were on the side on a huge mountain with no guard rail. I got some great pictures though : http://jonathanstites.cjb.cc/aspen/

    The breathing is getting better, I have been doing breathing exercises, don’t know if they have helped much.

    I thought about the cotton balls, but I only have one srt mute with me. I have to use it on the Mahler 1 excerpt also. So i guess i will play it about mp and hope its ok.
     
  5. dbacon

    dbacon Mezzo Piano User

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    Oct 24, 2003
    Scottsdale, AZ.
    Right you are, Manny. I know air flows to all portions of the lungs but "to the bottom of the lungs" is just a visualization that can encourage players to take a breath deeply. Allen Vizzutti uses this phrase and it can trigger a full open breath. Not one of those literal "here's exactly how this goes" kind of thing. I like to listen to the sound the air makes as you inhale, "OOH" sound almost inaudible so you hear there's no friction happening against the inhale.
     
  6. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    Sep 29, 2004
    USA
    Yes!!

    I was working with a student on exactly that yesterday and it's wonderful what a difference that made for him with everything... articulation, evenness of sound. It's like Charlie says, "Trumpet playing is so difficult because it's so simple".

    ML
     
  7. etownfwd

    etownfwd New Friend

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    Jan 8, 2004
    PA
    Manny Laureano wrote:

    Manny,
    Can you shed some light on the comment that "I have less air to begin with"? Could this be due to being smaller in stature? (btw, I root for the Muggsy Bogues' and Earl Boykins' in us all as I am only 5'6") I am curious to learn as much about breathing, posture, and the like as I can. About 5 years ago I studied with a former student of Arnold Jacob's. I have been making sure to make note of my posture and practice proper breathing, support, and posture ever since. How does one breathe "smarter"? Thanks for the help!
    -efwd
     
  8. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    Sep 29, 2004
    USA
    EFWD,

    I've never had a huge capacity like many of my colleagues so I took to heart something Arnold Jacobs said to me. He said that since his vital capacity was reduced that he had to become more efficient like a violinist who is using a shorter bow! That made much sense to me. I take many more breaths than most of my colleagues when playing Petrushka but i don't lose the sound or pulse because I've learned to take the maximum breath in the shortest amount of time I can.

    I just learned to change my "bow" more fequently without disrupting the flow of music. You have to have a concept of how you wqnt a phrase to sound and then use the available breath to make the phrase sing. Some of the most unmusical players I've heard have been folks with the biggest lungs because they just play until they're empty simply because they can without regard to how a phrase needs a beginning, middle, and end. You need to a thinker, a storyteller, as Arnold used to love to say, and have it all equal a musician.

    ML
     
  9. jcstites

    jcstites Mezzo Forte User

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    Jun 1, 2005
    Tallahassee, FL
    well i hope my breathing works in abuot an hour.

    i am leaving now to catch the bus for my audition... whew... hope i dont suck :D


    EDIT:


    well. the audition went HORRIBLE.... the worst ive ever played in like 3 years...

    dry mouth sucks! last chair here i come! :x
     
  10. BigBadWolf

    BigBadWolf Piano User

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    Nov 30, 2004
    Los Angeles, CA
    Don't you rotate parts? That's how it was when I was there ('98). You would play different parts in all of the orchestras exept never principal in Festival (Lou Ranger) or Chamber (Ray Mase) Orchestras. So even if you ahd a bad audition, they will get to hear you enough over the 2 months that they will have a better knowledge of your playing.
     

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