High note problems & Mouthpiece queries

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Justamirage, Feb 3, 2016.

  1. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    When you say "G on top of the staff," are you talking the G that sits right on the top line of the staff, or are you talking G, 5th ledger line above the staff?
     
  2. Justamirage

    Justamirage New Friend

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    Oh sorry, I mean't an octave above it. The G above the F on the top of the staff, and the G an octave above it. A.K.A up to double G, if I'm correct.
     
  3. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    Unfortunately, you're not.

    The first 'double' is double-high C, above the fifth leger line. So your talk of 'double A' etc has us thinking 8th leger line which is really confusing the issue.
     
  4. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    And we're back to this again - from the time I was in high school, it was generally regarded that anything above High C - 2nd ledger C - was considered "double" octave stuff - double F, G, A, and so forth, up to Double C, aka "Grand C," and anything above that was considered triple.

    This isn't just me not getting it - that was a generally understood thing by the trumpet players I was around, and as a military musician, I was around a lot of them. While it's entirely possible that we were all wrong, I think that somewhere along the way, things changed, and "double" began to refer to anything above Double C.
     
  5. Justamirage

    Justamirage New Friend

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    Aah, alright. I was told by a few players that was where the "doubles" start. But anyways, when I was referring to "double A and G" I was talking about the A an octave above the A directly above the staff.
     
  6. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    Ok - that works for me. Did you ever answer the question about whether or not you have the same issues on other trumpets?
     
  7. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    Entirely understood.

    But the rest of the musical world, not just trumpets, partition their octaves starting on the C. B (and even B#) is always the lower designated octave.

    There's a Rowuk stickie somewhere that lays out the convention for all at TM to follow if we are to avoid being forever at crossed purposes.

    My understanding of it is that 2nd leger is high C, and the space above that, high D. And so on to 5th leger high B.

    EDIT: http://www.trumpetmaster.com/vb/f131/double-c-read-before-posting-anything-45824.html#post426579
     
  8. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Not disagreeing that pressure is needed, but I question your promotion as the lips for the source of pressure. All you need are vibrating lips. The less pressure on the lips the more ability to vibrate. To do this you need strength in the lips and insertion pressure giving this strength with the most muscle fiber use is muscles supporting the orbicularis that insert onto the zyogomatic arch. The pressure that moves the air, if this is indeed the pressure to which you refer, is what sounds the note. This pressure comes from the abdominal and chest muscles. So to be clear, it is not pressure from the lip muscles that gives volume and fullness to the sound but rather the air flow from below.

    Again, look at Mr Morison's video. Here the sound grow in volume as he pushes the trumpet away from his lip. In so doing his is putting less pressure on the lip, and creating more sound.
     
  9. Justamirage

    Justamirage New Friend

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    Yep, that's definitely it. Just picked up two of my other horns, both of them being student horns ( a King 600 and a Pathfinder which I dont know the number to). It has to be the instrument, played octave leaps to multiple E's, up the scale to E, and above E. All of them worked fine except the other horn. I'm thinking of picking up a horn from Trent Austin now since I'm in need of a new one.
     
  10. rufflicks

    rufflicks Pianissimo User

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