High note terms?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by TrumpetScreamer, Jul 1, 2008.

  1. TrumpetScreamer

    TrumpetScreamer New Friend

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    I have heard so many terms for these notes over the past couple of months while I have been expanding my range that I have become somewhat confused. So I just have a couple questions regarding the names people use for these notes.

    Is 'Double C' and 'High C' the same note?

    Is 'Super C' a 'Double C' or a 'Tripple C'?'

    Maynard Ferguson hits a note called 'Big F' a bunch of times in the song 'Livin' for the City'. Is that the highest note in the double octave F Scale (Concert Eb Scale)?

    I thought I knew what these were but it seems like everyone has their own name for these notes, so I figured someone could help clear it up for me.

    Thanks!
     
  2. oldlips48

    oldlips48 Piano User

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    I get confused on this as well. IMHO, here's how I interpret it (let the debate begin!!):

    Middle C or "Low" C: C below the treble staff.
    C, or "tuning" C: C on the staff.

    High C: first C above the treble staff (second ledger line).
    Double C: also first C above the treble staff.

    Double high C: second C above the treble staff (between ledger lines 5 and 6)
    Triple C: Same as double high C

    I would use the above adjectives to describe any of the notes (beginning with "A") that are in that same range. For instance, the F above the high C I would call high F (or maybe double F).

    And I must admit, a "Super C" is a new one on me.

    (I sometimes think that if we stuck to naming only the notes we could actually PLAY, then naming them would be much simpler!!)
     
  3. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    There is no debate, only tmers not willing to do a simple search!

    First of all, ALL octaves start with C.

    DoubleC (CC) is actually a bass note a couple of octaves BELOW the bass clef. Tubas are often called BB or CC instruments.

    The double c that most juvenile at heart talk (the players that really can reliably use the note let the horn talk!) about is 2 octaves above the treble clef. It is not and has never been the same as high c which is 2 ledger lines above the treble clef. Middle c is called that because it is in the middle between the bass and treble clefs.

    I just call that note: "too high for me most of the time"!
     
  4. oldlips48

    oldlips48 Piano User

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    This is one of the reasons I visit TM, to take advantage of the more knowledgeable.

    So Robin, why does there tend to be confusion in the naming? (I sight myself as an example). I admit my confusion over high C vs. double C comes from seeing it referenced that way in other sources.

    And I agree, if I stuck to talking about only the notes I could play, this would all be a moot point (except maybe for the high C on a good day!):-)

    Steve
     
  5. patdublc

    patdublc Pianissimo User

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    It is easy to get confused. There was a post a while back on "another forum" where a reputable player said that double high G is the one just above high C on the fourth ledger line above the treble staff. So, the basic logic there is that the break in the nomenclature is at the top of the staff.
    I much prefer the explanation that Rowuk used that describes each octave as the transition point for the terminology.
     
  6. Al Innella

    Al Innella Forte User

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    In the trumpet range low F# is the lowest note,any notes played lower are pedalnotes. The C below the staff is our lowest C or lowC. That puts the middle space C our middle C. The C an octave higher is our high C. The C twice as high is our double high C also called super C.
     
  7. Al Innella

    Al Innella Forte User

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    :-)
     
  8. note360

    note360 Piano User

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    In a room in a house
    I use numbers

    C4 being middle C (C below the staff)
    C5 being C on the staff
    C6 being C above the staff
    and so on.

    Thats just me. It makes more sense to me than. SUPER C and DUBBA C
     
  9. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Steve,
    the confusion comes from bragging rights and talking about stuff not learned. There is so much published info on intonation, scales, tuning and the like, but is also a generation of multiple choice spoon-fed players. Spoon feeding is one of the functions of an open forum internet - and one of the reasons that my posts sometimes have an aftertaste - medicine does not always taste good.

    Here is an excellent explanation by a great trumpet embouchure teacher:
    Trumpet Lessons

    This terminology comes from Double High being in the second octave and triple high being in the third octave above the staff. It is actually not complicated and there is no reason for confusion if one checks terminology out before opening the mouth. Only trumpet players seem to have problems with this - maybe there is an issue with brain function due to lack of oxygen when squeezing these notes out for the first time?:twisted:
     
  10. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    No! High C is 2 octaves higher than middle C. Middle C is below the staff (it is called "middle" because it is in the middle of the bass and treble clefs). The C in the staff has no name in this scheme - other than 3rd space C, high C is above the staff and so forth.
     

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