High Notes, or the lack there of...

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by LSN1052, Sep 5, 2009.

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  1. trumpetnick

    trumpetnick Fortissimo User

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    Vidin, Bulgaria
    Laker,

    What is important is not only to do things that Wilmer advised you, but how you do things. Make sure to get your breathing and tonguing together, get rod of any unnecessary body tension David G. Monette Corporation - Pitch Center and Body Use and get a private TRUMPET teacher if don' already have one and follow his directions.

    Don't forget that TM has a search feature - USE IT!
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2009
  2. tranqB

    tranqB New Friend

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    Apr 21, 2009
    C-Town
    Hi High Register Challenged,
    Here's 2 things you can do to raise your range.
    1. Strengthen your lips by holding the erasure end of a pencil in your lips for 5 minutes everyday
    2. Use just your mouthpiece and warm up with a simple scale. Then play as low as possible for a few longtones. NOW, play as high as possible without putting any pressure on your lips from the mouthpiece (think to yourself...faster air .... just relax) in a week you will be up a 1/2 to 1 step. keep it up and you will have a strong confident high C.
    God Bless

    1940 Martin Handcraft Committee
    1946 Chicago Benge
    1923 King Liberty
    1946 Conn 80A
    1956 Connstellation 28A
    Conn Vintage One Flugel
    1919 Conn 10A
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2009
  3. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Notice that the artists don't agree with your estimation that the embouchure "sucks".

    Until body tension, body use and breath support are straightened out, you really don't know if the "embouchure" is the problem.

    Weak chops are generally based on bad habits and lack of dedication.

    Your first step is to do what your teacher says. I hope that consists of big breath and long tones, then big breath and slurs then big breath and easy tunes. Once you have slowed down, started practicing enough and learned how to breath, many other issues disappear.
     
  4. Al Innella

    Al Innella Forte User

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    If you are a junior in high school and are practicing every day and still can't play up to high C your most likely doing something wrong with your embouchure, some times all it takes is a minor adjustment to get on the right track. I practiced all the Arban's , Clarke Studies, lip slurs ,long tones etc., and had trouble with my high register until I was 25 yrs. old , I had to make an adjustment in how I used and placed my lower jaw, I went from an E above the staff, and then gained more than a octave to my range, so if you can find someone who understands different embouchures and embouchure types,talk and take some lessons with him/her , a lot of teachers and players who never had an embouchure problem won't understand why you can't increase range when your practicing all the right things, sometimes all it takes is a little guidance in the right direction , if you have been playing since elementary school through middle ,and now a junior in high school and still have trouble above the staff you may need more help than being told, just play scales and everything will be alright.
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2009
  5. LSN1052

    LSN1052 New Friend

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    Lee's Summit, Missouri
    the only book i have is a james stamp book.

    I play out of the arbans book every year what they give me for all state, but i dont have the book itself.

    My private teacher gave me sheet music with Clarke Studies at the top, it was like a triplet pattern in the different keys.

    But do i need a book that tells me how to do long tones and lip slurs

    Everybody on the second page helped a lot.
    Thanks.
     
  6. trumpetnick

    trumpetnick Fortissimo User

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    Nov 16, 2005
    Vidin, Bulgaria
    Believe me LSN,

    Arban's and Clarke's books are much more than just slurs and long tones. Arban is one of the most comprehensive and used trumpet/cornet methods ever written. There is as much for your technique as for your enjoyment and musicianship (duets, characteristic studies and solos). Clarke is more concentrated on instrumental technique (articulations and finger dexterity) but is used successfully by many to build high chops. Stamp is a good book, but cannot replace the other 2.
    Many of my colleagues here in Bulgaria call the Arban Grande Methode "The trumpeter's bible".
     
  7. GordonH

    GordonH Mezzo Forte User

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    You need to find a good teacher.
    I phoned up the principal trumpet of one of the main professional orchestras who also teaches in a conservatory and arranged lessons with him.
    This was very, very beneficial and did not cost a huge amount either.

    You really need to be seen playing to get any sort of diagnosis.
    Generally though the most common problems are to do with embouchure efficiency.
    I had this and had to get lessons to get it diagnosed and fixed.
    It was not easy.
    I sounded like a kid for three months and all I was playing was Schlossberg studies, which are a bit like the Clarke ones. After six months I was much stronger and back playing better than I had ever done.
     
  8. NickD

    NickD Forte User

    First, listen to Wilmer about the Clarkes thing. Noticethe SOFT PLAYING thing.

    I have been to clinics by Jim Manely and Roger Ingram recently. The three of us all have exchanged emails on the subject and there is a common theme - soft playing to set the chops up of the upper register. You don't even have to play the upper register to get the form set up! This supports the advice of other posters here telling you to not press the high note issue for a while till you develop proper habits - form.

    The one thing that I do a little differently is focus on form as opposed to strength. I never think of myself as building strength in my chops. I think of myself as playing with a proper form that I have developed over the years of thoughtful hard work on all of this.

    Here is a list of things I think about with all of this.

    Soft playing
    Aperture control - loud = bigger; soft = smaller; low = bigger; high = smaller; loud and low = biggest; soft and high = smallest
    Lip flexibility - forces the issue of proper tongue position
    Lip flexibilities played SOFTLY combines the concepts - requires control

    Form and control - once you develop those, they don't get tired.

    Final bit of advice: continue to work dilligently with your teacher whilst keeping an open mind to new ideas as they impinge on you.

    FWIIW coming from me...

    Peace!

    Nick
     
  9. GordonH

    GordonH Mezzo Forte User

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    I forgot to say, for those three months I didn't play above piano.
    I was told that playing loudly is just doing more of the same as when you are playing quietly and certainly my control and tone improved a lot.
    I now rarely play loudly in the house.
     
  10. LSN1052

    LSN1052 New Friend

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    Sep 5, 2009
    Lee's Summit, Missouri
    I dont have a Clarke book but i found a pdf on the internet. This one starts on low F# [in the staff] and it goes up chromatically?? that one. i hope?? :dontknow: :play: :dontknow:
     
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