High School Band

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by audwey11, Dec 8, 2015.

  1. iiipopes

    iiipopes Pianissimo User

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    Be quiet and unassuming. Be absolutely "professional" in your attitude and demeanor - always being prepared to the best of your ability and on time. Thank your section mates for a good performance. Only offer advice when asked and then be as succinct as possible. Ask your folks about private lessons. The rest will come.

    By definition at my high school, freshmen did not play in the "varsity" concert band with sophomores, juniors and seniors, although we all marched together for half time field shows and parades. But...I was fortunate to be in a similar position in choir as a freshman. Unfortunately, I did not always heed the above words, and as a consequence I was hazed severely by upperclassmen.
     
  2. Dennis78

    Dennis78 Fortissimo User

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    Sounds like your on the right path! Keep up the good work!
     
  3. richtom

    richtom Forte User

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    The best players sit at the top of the section.
    Second and third parts are rarely, if ever, more difficult than a 1st part. Principal trumpets basically have all the solos and many first parts go well beyond the second and third parts technically and musically. The principal is also the leader of the section and sets the style.
    She won the chair because she plays better than the rest of them.
    There are many stories of the great lead players of old such as Bernie Glow and Conrad Gozzo. Guys would come into the recording session not knowing who was sitting on the lead part and leave it open in case either of them would show up. Mind you, any of the other session players could easily sit lead, but out of respect, they waited.
    She is their leader.
    Rich T.
     
  4. Dennis78

    Dennis78 Fortissimo User

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    When I was in HS 1st chair was held by seniors, 2nd juniors and third was made up of sophomores and freshman. That's just the way it worked with that band director. We were not short on talented hard working kids by far. Every year we had at least 6 on each part and a huge 3rd section, we actually sometimes had some fourth parts. By absolute ease of play I would always want to be first, but of all the parts I've played the difficulty is always the same except for fourth because those always seem to come up in music with a ton of time changes and that's not fun when counting 35 measures of rests
     
  5. audwey11

    audwey11 Pianissimo User

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    Gee, thanks! It is definitely a balance between being confident enough to be a leader, but not so confident that it reads as arrogance.
     
  6. ewetho

    ewetho Piano User

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    I was once a snot nosed freshman who could play. I would go play the high parts with the first part when I could and play all the high C and Bb stuff. When preparing for final concert after lots of playing that day and a 2+ hour concert and their chops were shot I grabbed their part and we played on no problem carried the part easily till the firsts grabbed their part back and loudly announced that's enough. Director just laughed. I think our junior did not play next year so she would nat have to possibly be second chair. I would have given it to her but.... All the high lead stuff I loved.

    Play hard have fun and try and make it fun. Laugh and enjoy yourself and you line the rest will work out. If they want the chair back the can earn it. Simple enough. If you have a capable senior I would trade solos unless the director says bit make him/her say no. There are cats that made my head spin too.
     
  7. BigDub

    BigDub Fortissimo User

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    Just the fact that you have a sensitivity toward the matter has you in the right place. Try to maintain that humility with your relationships to the others, but do all the talking with your mouthpiece attached to your lips, in other words, let your playing do the talking! Also it might be a good idea to politely ask the band director not to bring your being a freshman up as often, or at all. This will help also.
     
  8. kcmt01

    kcmt01 Mezzo Forte User

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    No matter how you handle the situation, there will be those who are jealous. My advice is to work harder than anyone else. If they see your work ethic, at least their jealousy won't be deserved. And when you are complimented, you will be able to say, "Thank you, I worked hard." True humility.
     
  9. audwey11

    audwey11 Pianissimo User

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    Update on band: I have noticed a slight change in the demeanor of those around me. I am starting to notice slight resentment, especially with the junior that is second chair. I am still maintaining the advice given and being as civil and humble possible. Being egotistical and petty is the opposite of what I want to do.
     
  10. BigDub

    BigDub Fortissimo User

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    One piece of advice I had gotten, even as an adult, was:"Not everybody is going to like you......"
    My answer to him was, "yeah, maybe so, but that doesn't mean I can't try my best to be a friend to everyone"

    Now, what does this mean? It's true, not everyone is going to like you in life, but my philosophy is, it will be their fault if they don't like me, not mine, if I can help it!
     

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