Hitting "Super C's" just not on the gig. Frustration :(

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by sounds7, Apr 18, 2014.

  1. sounds7

    sounds7 Forte User

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    Here is the problem and I hope that there is a solution for me. The band I perform with quite often has a very demanding book with very little lip recuperation time like rests or time between tunes. Gigs are 3 to 4 hours long. Last week end we played a 4 hour gig and took a 25 minute break. Most of the trumpet parts are between f on the top line and e above high c with occasional scream high notes. Add to all this that the band plays very loud and I have to blow hard to hear myself over them. I think because I am blowing harder I am unconsciously using more pressure which is to prevent the seal from leaking air. I get to where my range is limited to F above high C and anything above that is a gamble. What to do? I can hit the notes I do it all the time when I practice so it has to be the situation and I can not create that situation when I practice.

    I welcome your comments
     
  2. acarcido

    acarcido Forte User

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    I would suggest playing along with a recording using some high quality headphones and no feedback from your playing into a mic. Just play statically and increase the volume as you play. You will feel yourself playing but not hear yourself all that great. This should simulate the same as when you play with your band live. Also, keep increasing the volume till you drown out yourself but try and record your playing to criticize yourself. Good luck
     
  3. sounds7

    sounds7 Forte User

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    Good Idea
     
  4. acarcido

    acarcido Forte User

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    Playing this way and then listening to your recorded playing will focus you more on what you need to really key in as far as endurance, range, volume and tone. You will also be working out your lung capacity to your maximum limits. Just beware of the neighbors or wife who will be yelling at you to turn it down, and you will never hear that shoe flying towards your head. LOL Happened once to me when my wife could not reach my practice cage in the garage.
     
  5. VetPsychWars

    VetPsychWars Fortissimo User

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    Some sort of monitor seems to be the way to go here, whether it's a reflecting shield or a feed back from the soundboard or an extra mic to some ear buds....

    Tom
     
  6. Wondra

    Wondra Pianissimo User

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    Brian, I was in the same situation for several years. What worked for me was musician ear plugs (the band was at 110 - 120 db), a decent mix in the monitors, and always checking myself to ensure I was staying at a maximum of 70 - 80% in terms of my own volume. Whenever I got carried away and let the band energy drive my volume, I'd over blow and start to shut down, which encouraged me to blow harder - a downward spiral to say the least! So while it is counterintuitive to play at medium volume in these situations, as long as the sound guy is doing a good job of mixing the mains, you'll sound like you are playing at 120 db with the rest of them :cool:
     
  7. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Years ago I bought a Sound Level Meter from Radio Shack. It was a fun toy and I took it to lessons. I called it a "Laut-o-meter." I would have the students watch it while playing a memorized scale or long tones, and would encourage them to repeat while playing louder. Usually they could bump it up about 4dB's and I didn't tell them about the logarithmic nature of dB's. (Heh-heh-heh!) Then I would have them listen to their sound quality while 4 dB'splaying louder. They would agree that it sounded better while not being much louder. They would, however complain that it was more work.

    I agree with those who advise to back-off in performance to play like you do in home practice, memorize the feel and let the sound system do the work.
     
  8. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Jettone Studio B.
     
  9. DaTrump

    DaTrump Forte User

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    You are probably also playing above center from using too much pressure to compensate when you need more volume. Plus even among more experienced gigging players, gig nerves affect us all. Just sit back in the horn and do what you came to do, just like practice. You can do it so the technique is not the issue. When you get to the gig, playing should be second nature. Don't think about that too much.

    Also, ear plugs man, they are really a game changer. I would venture to say that most players think they aren't loud enough when they already are. Monitors, while a seemingly good idea can mull up the sound. Have them put the band into your ear.
     
  10. sounds7

    sounds7 Forte User

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    Got a link to some of these musician ear plugs?
     

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