Hitting the High Notes.

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Jackaman321, Jun 9, 2009.

  1. Jackaman321

    Jackaman321 New Friend

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    Jun 9, 2009
    Hi,

    I recently have come back to Trumpet after a 2 year break. I have been back in the game for about 1 month now and im starting to get eager on increasing my range. After 2 weeks i could hit a G just on top of the stave and this is still the highest i can hit. I was wondering if anyone could give my tips, exercises and book recomendation to increase my embrochure strength and my range. Any help is welcome, thanks
     
  2. Bloomin Untidy Musician

    Bloomin Untidy Musician Piano User

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    Jan 14, 2008
    Staffordshire
    What about caressing the high notes?
    Using the word "hitting" suggests using tension and machismo to achieve high notes. Excellent players make every articulation/dynamic/pitch look relaxed.


    If you do a search on this topic within the search facility you will find many excellent ideas upon your question. This question is asked on nearly a weekly basis.
     
  3. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Jackaman,
    just forget it. Chops are earned and that takes time. Rushing the upper range just leads to bad habits. Pay your dues, do not try and associate trumpeting with things that you can legally/illegally download for free to cheat the system.

    Standard fare for great trumpet players is a good teacher, Clarke and Arban. Anything additional is gravy.
     
  4. Jimi Michiel

    Jimi Michiel Forte User

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    We're constantly bombarded with amazing, finished products--Wynton, Arturo, Maynard. We see those guys do amazing things, but we never see the work that went into the creation of those skills, or the constant work that goes into maintaining those skills. We can buy the $15 CD, but to play like that ourselves is much, much more expensive...
     
  5. willbarber

    willbarber Piano User

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    Nov 22, 2008
    Medina, NY
    Well said Jimi.

    Mad props, dawg.
     
  6. markquinn

    markquinn New Friend

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    Jun 9, 2009
    rowuk's response to your question has some valid points, but I would like to take the conversation deeper for better understanding.

    The combination of Teeth, Lips and Jaw form the base for any wind instrument embouchure. The popular concept that the lips alone form the emboucure is not exactly true. Any player will have to address their individual formations of these three elements in the production of a tone on a wind instrument.

    You had said that you were coming back from 2 years off the horn. I am coming back from about 15 years off the horn, and will share with you that you will have to address your natural embouche state. Muscles have not been exercised for quite some time and will take time to return to previous performance status. You must avoid sacrifice toward correct muscular formation across the measure of tone, tempo, range, volume and duration, in order to enjoy short lived periods of upper register playing. Without proper formation, it will be short lived.

    I was able to get myself back on track toward material I was playing in college with about 12 hours of focused attentive practice across one weeks time. I had to be mindful of where the muscular function was and what it needed at all times during those practice sessions so that I did not slide backward. I spent most of that time in scales and longer note durations.

    If you are serious about study of how your physiology works in relation to your trumpet playing, may I recommend exploring www.anatowind.com. I wrote an article on their homepage dealing with much the same questions a month or so ago entitled "It’s never too late to address one’s physiology" that you may be able to identifiy with.

    Check out the Anatowind page and if you are serious about study, contact them for additional information.
     
  7. gbdeamer

    gbdeamer Forte User

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    Oct 16, 2008

    Great points in my opinion. I think it's important to remember that mileage will vary with "comebacks". There are too many variables that come into play to be able to predict individual results. The fact that after a week markquinn is almost back to his college level after a 2 year layoff can't be considered typical anymore than can someone taking 12 months to get back into shape after a 2 year layoff.

    I think the key for all comebackers is getting back into a standard daily routine and building (gradually) from there...
     
  8. markquinn

    markquinn New Friend

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    Jun 9, 2009
    Mileage may vary to a point. The key is understanding your muscular function of where your embouchure is and what it needs to progress to the next step.

    I was able to do what I did because I followed my muscular set correctly and did not play outside what the natural embouchure could accomplish at that point. I also worked long enough to stimulate growth and continue the progress the next day. I played several times a day and keep things very focused and kept records and notes in order to stay on track.
     
  9. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Markquinn,
    I personally feel that MOST players have no great advantage in the analysis of what muscles do what. Most of the players that I have worked with benefitted greatly by FREEING themselves of a focus on the anatomy, and putting their energy into a "relaxed", "care free" approach.

    This does not mean that your method won't work, I just feel that the complementary behaviour of the face is so complex, that even if we have an idea what the geometry theoretically should look like, we are not capable of that degree of control - if what we think is right at all.

    I do not teach anatomy. I teach the body to blow. Inhale and exhale in a very big and relaxed way. That just has given more reliable results across a broader range of players than anything else.
     
  10. markquinn

    markquinn New Friend

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    Jun 9, 2009
    You hit the point that is most important!

    Most players DO NOT have the knowledge to do an analysis of what the muscles are doing within their embouchure. This is not taught in the convential music system. I went through all the years in college and did not have some of the questions I had about my playing answered until I started to pursue this form of study. I had teeth removed from my mouth for braces and moved around during my high school and college years. I had no answers as to how to address that change in the embouchure and could not make an explanation of why that was important until I began to learn of the importance of the study of teeth, lips and jaw.

    The most exciting part of the Anatowind practice is that it can be replicated, its a formula science. Check out Anatowind Music Clinic History There is over 5o years of research into this method.

    The method has made a total difference in the way that I play and approach the horn and I feel that information should be shared for others to take advantage of. I have seen the method be replicated among all ages of students and am planning to implement the process with my starting trumpet players next year when I take over a band program.

    Go to the website, look at the information and contact them if you want to learn more.
     

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