Horn cleanliness

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by mgcoleman, Jul 11, 2013.

  1. dBeav

    dBeav Pianissimo User

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    I'm sure it wouldn't hurt and there's only one way to find out.
     
  2. Dean_0

    Dean_0 Piano User

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    ROFL I,m sure your fine ;-):think::think::think:

    Dean_0
     
  3. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Sure, what's a few IQ points between rounds anyway?
     
  4. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    95 Proof Everclear is only 42.5% alcohol, still a few drinks of it and who would care about anything else.
     
  5. amzi

    amzi Forte User

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    Isn't Everclear 190 proof? That makes it 95%. I understand they also make a 151 proof version, but what fun is that. Anyway--I'm not as diligent as I should be about cleaning my horns and am now beginning to wonder if that contributed to my pneumonia last year and my very slow recovery!. Time to get out the swabs and buy some alcohol.
     
  6. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    My bad! Duh!
     
  7. Dean_0

    Dean_0 Piano User

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    Even though i Bathe my playing horn every month er so ,i am always thinking it could be cleaner,now i know Clorox kills most any germs and bad stuff on contact,but is it safe to use on a laquer horn ? i would'nt think so?

    One thing i have done since the start of my comeback is let my horns get lots of air , i think it helps with the nasties a lot.

    Dean_0
     
  8. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Here is what the CDC says:

    Alcohol
    Overview. In the healthcare setting, "alcohol" refers to two water-soluble chemical compounds—ethyl alcohol and isopropyl alcohol—that have generally underrated germicidal characteristics. FDA has not cleared any liquid chemical sterilant or high-level disinfectant with alcohol as the main active ingredient. These alcohols are rapidly bactericidal rather than bacteriostatic against vegetative forms of bacteria; they also are tuberculocidal, fungicidal, and virucidal but do not destroy bacterial spores. Their cidal activity drops sharply when diluted below 50% concentration, and the optimum bactericidal concentration is 60%–90% solutions in water (volume/volume).

    Chlorine and Chlorine Compounds
    Overview. Hypochlorites, the most widely used of the chlorine disinfectants, are available as liquid (e.g., sodium hypochlorite) or solid (e.g., calcium hypochlorite). The most prevalent chlorine products in the United States are aqueous solutions of 5.25%–6.15% sodium hypochlorite (see glossary), usually called household bleach. They have a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity, do not leave toxic residues, are unaffected by water hardness, are inexpensive and fast acting, remove dried or fixed organisms and biofilms from surfaces, and have a low incidence of serious toxicity. Sodium hypochlorite at the concentration used in household bleach (5.25-6.15%) can produce ocular irritation or oropharyngeal, esophageal, and gastric burns. Other disadvantages of hypochlorites include corrosiveness to metals in high concentrations (>500 ppm), inactivation by organic matter [such as grease], discoloring or "bleaching" of fabrics, release of toxic chlorine gas when mixed with ammonia or acid (e.g., household cleaning agents), and relative stability 327. The microbicidal activity of chlorine is attributed largely to undissociated hypochlorous acid (HOCl). The dissociation of HOCI to the less microbicidal form (hypochlorite ion OCl¯) depends on pH. The disinfecting efficacy of chlorine decreases with an increase in pH that parallels the conversion of undissociated HOCI to OCl¯. A potential hazard is production of the carcinogen bis(chloromethyl) ether when hypochlorite solutions contact formaldehyde and the production of the animal carcinogen trihalomethane when hot water is hyperchlorinated. After reviewing environmental fate and ecologic data, EPA has determined the currently registered uses of hypochlorites will not result in unreasonable adverse effects to the environment.

    The CDC did not publish problems with using alcohol; I did not leave this intentionally out of my CDC review. Bottom line: If you can use non-chlorinated water, then using Clorox would likely be safe, but with grease deactivating, sterilization of the valve casing my not occur. With alcohol you have no worry what so ever. There has also been no medical evidence as to the benefit of Clorox, whereas the evidence supporting isopropyl alcohol is the best possible medical evidence as to the effect of controlling organisms that live on brass surfaces.
     
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2013
  9. dBeav

    dBeav Pianissimo User

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    So what about vinegar?
     
  10. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Vinegar is food for many organisms, so many of the critters living in your horn will say "thank you - burp". Also vinegar is acidic albeit a weak acid; however, over time acids leach out some of the metals as ions it creates at the surface. I would not recommend vinegar over alcohol. The CDC does not discuss this agent as it is not considered a disinfectant.
     

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