Horn pictures

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Wlfgng, Feb 7, 2009.

  1. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

    7,846
    6,829
    Jul 20, 2006
    Heart of Dixie
    Thanks. I know I'd be no good at it either, so I sent my cornet to Artistic Engraving. The pictures really don't do it justice - Sherry did a fantastic job on it.

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Publius_

    Publius_ Banned

    118
    0
    Jan 21, 2009
    ----
    I can tell it was done by an artist. I might even get something like that done to my horn in the future. How much did it cost to do that?
     
  3. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

    7,846
    6,829
    Jul 20, 2006
    Heart of Dixie
    It is a stock design, 'Bach Stradivarius Deluxe', and was $180 plus shipping both ways.
     
  4. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

    7,772
    2,321
    Oct 18, 2007
    The Wide Brown Land
    Dale, very pretty engraving, how do you manage to keep all the little discontinuities, created by the engraving, so beautifully clean? Is it a problem at all?
     
  5. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

    7,846
    6,829
    Jul 20, 2006
    Heart of Dixie
    No problem. It stays really clean by itself.
     
  6. jeremy

    jeremy New Friend

    2
    0
    Mar 26, 2009
    I think u should go in light and use the flash
     
  7. jeremy

    jeremy New Friend

    2
    0
    Mar 26, 2009
    hey do u know how i can find out information about a trumpet that i bought for my son.. its a CAMELOT... serial # 623774
     
  8. Publius_

    Publius_ Banned

    118
    0
    Jan 21, 2009
    ----
    Hey dale what kind of cornet is it? Its hard to read it because of the lighting
     
  9. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

    7,846
    6,829
    Jul 20, 2006
    Heart of Dixie
    It's a Bach Strad 184 cornet, large bore, gold brass bell.
     
  10. SpitKey

    SpitKey New Friend

    17
    0
    Dec 3, 2005
    Phoenix, Arizona
    Dale Proctor used the right technique.

    QUOTE:
    The easiest way is to go outside on a bright day and take the pics in an area not in direct sunlight. A darker, light-absorbing background can look good, but I've seen some very nice pics with white backgrounds, too. Here's an example - this one was taken on a sunny day on my patio under the picnic table umbrella, no flash, with the inside of the case as the background - pretty simple stuff.

    Since a trumpet is a "shinny" object it will reflect everything around it. A small light source, e. g. a flash, will just create a "hot spot" and generally not look attractive. Shooting outside on a cloudy day, or in the shade, w/o flash will usually give the most pleasing results, and it's easy to do.

    If you have to make the photos inside because there's a blinding snowstorm, or it's -25° outside, you can "bounce" some light off the ceiling assuming it's white or near white. By this I mean to direct a light source(s) at the ceiling instead of the horn. This will produce a soft, over all light that works well with highly reflective subjects. If you really want to get jazzy you can place pieces of white paper or cardboard close to the instrument, (but out of the cameras view). These will create highlights that will add some "sparkle" to your photos.

    MOST IMPORTANTLY IS TO USE A TRIPOD.
     

Share This Page