Horn repair?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Rawdatalab, Mar 18, 2009.

  1. Rawdatalab

    Rawdatalab New Friend

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    Jan 13, 2009
    Saint Albans, NY
    My trumpet seems to be developing red rot on the receiver, right near where it meets the brace (or I hear it may be acid bleed). It doesn't seem to have spread to any other parts (except a smidge on the edge of the brace).

    Here's the thing, though. It's a Holton T602 of fairly modern vintage (how new? Serial's not even listed on the old Holton site). So do I...
    a) have the receiver replaced?
    b) Have the whole darn leadpipe replaced (which I hear can do wonders for sound)?
    c) Just replace the horn? I could probably find another on eBay for less than $200 or so. Mind you, I've only been playing for a year or so (and only about 6 months on this horn), so I'm only semi-attached to it.

    What say you, TM Elders?
     
  2. Brekelefuw

    Brekelefuw Fortissimo User

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    Mar 21, 2006
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    If the rot is on the inside it is red rot. If it is on the outside, it might be acid rot, or the late stages of red rot where it has eaten right through your leadpipe.

    Replacing the leadpipe is not a difficult thing to do, although it won't be cheap because leadpipes have to be made or ordered.
     
  3. govtmodel

    govtmodel Pianissimo User

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    Compare the cost of repacing the receiver/leadpipe to replacing the horn, then decide.
     
  4. oldlou

    oldlou Forte User

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    Until you notice marked deterioration of the trumpets tone and intonation, just keep playing the thing. If what you are upset about is the inherant playability of that student grade horn, start looking for a higher grade instrument.


    OLDLOU>>
     
  5. Dave Mickley

    Dave Mickley Forte User

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    I bought a great playing L.A. Benge 2X+ that had several bubbles under the lead pipe. I kept the lead pipe clean and put a couple of drops of valve oil down the lead pipe when finished playing. I had that horn for over 8 years and the red rot never progressed. as old lou said keep playing the horn until you notice a problem. By the way I never put a horn back in the case until it completely drys out on my stand. When I play other than at home the first thing I do when I get home is put my horn on a stand to dry out.
     
  6. Bob Grier

    Bob Grier Forte User

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    Good advice from oldlou.
     

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