How a flugel is to be played.

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Kujo20, Nov 11, 2013.

  1. Kujo20

    Kujo20 Forte User

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    Why is it that there is this common belief that the flugelhorn should only be played a certain way? From what I've read/seen on here, the other forum, on YouTube, and out in the real world... is that the flugelhorn must ALWAYS be played in a certain way. That way being, soft, warm, buttery, smoky, sexy, dark, lyrical, ballad like, and on and on.

    Yes, I agree that this is how it should usually play, and that the instrument lends itself to these characteristics. I myself try to play the flugel this way 90% of the time. BUT!!!..... I don't find it wrong to throw a shallower mouthpiece in once in a while and release a more wild side. The flugelhorn has such a wide (potential) spectrum of color/timbre, and I feel like it may be going unnoticed.

    Any thoughts out there?

    Kujo
     
  2. Kujo20

    Kujo20 Forte User

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    Another thought...

    Tons of us have bought "hybrid" mouthpieces for our trumpet to achieve a more flugel like sound. Nobody really seems to have a problem with that. But I've seen it a hundred times on YouTube videos (and the like), were somebody gets after the flugel player for sounding too trumpety. Then they go on to suggesting deep flugel mouthpieces...

    If it's ok to try sounding like a flugel on trumpet, why isn't it ok to try sounding like a trumpet on flugel?

    Just food for thought... These questions popped into my brain and I want to get other opinions.

    Kujo
     
  3. bumblebee

    bumblebee Fortissimo User

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    I'm not so sure that many trumpet players who try to sound like a flugelhorn succeed all that well, for instance sounding like this:

    flugelhorn jazz with Randy Brecker "Blue Moon" - YouTube (I notice Mr Brecker changes to a trumpet at 8:35)

    Can you point me to a particularly "trumpety" flugelhorn example?

    --bumblebee
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2013
  4. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

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    Could it be that there is a certain expectation of what a Flugelhorn sounds like because that's, er, what a Flugelhorn sounds like? :evil:

    I see no reason why anyone couldn't play "trumpety" on a flugelhorn at times if that's what they wanted, especially if that is their main horn or if they're playing a gig on Flugelhorn and just want a contrast. At the same time, why would anyone routinely play a Flugelhorn trumpety when trumpets are available? I think you're overthinking this.

    As an aside, Flugelhorns are used often in Germany and these instruments, while matching the conical instruments like the Bariton horn, sound to me a bit different from the American/jazz concept, which is a bit more nasaly, perhaps from the French concept. Not much "Flugely" in an American/jazz context. If I'm not mistaken, early jazz Flugelhorn playing had a strong Couesnon/French concept, if not the actual instruments.
     
  5. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    The German flugelhorns are usually played with trumpet mouthpieces, and quite often shallow ones. I know of one American who would sometimes plug his 14A4a trumpet mouthpiece into his Getzen flugelhorn and get a really cool, nasty sound in solos.
     
  6. mickvanflugel

    mickvanflugel Forte User

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    Well, there is no flugel police - at least there should not be :-) ,
    just different sound concepts.

    Comparing them would mean comparing
    apples to bananas IMO.
     
  7. bumblebee

    bumblebee Fortissimo User

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    You mean, like comparing two pieces of fruit?

    Not to mention throwing things like flumpets into the mix...

    --bumblebee
     
  8. mickvanflugel

    mickvanflugel Forte User

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    Yes, what I meant was two pieces of fruit (or even more, as you say... :-) )
     
  9. Brekelefuw

    Brekelefuw Fortissimo User

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    Flugel isn't even in the same instrument family. You don't approach it the same way as a trumpet, although most players just attack the horn like they do a trumpet.
     
  10. TrumpetMD

    TrumpetMD Fortissimo User

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    There are certain trumpet players who have a distinct sound. If you play a recording of Chet, Miles, Maynard, Harry James, Herb Alpert, Chris Botti, etc., you can probably pick them out just by their sound. They're all trumpet players. But they all have a distinct sound.

    So why doesn't this apply to the flugelhorn?

    Why is there only one way to sound on a flugelhorn?

    And why are there only three ways to play a flugelhorn? (If it's not the right sound, then it's either "trumpety" or "tromboney".)

    I partially agree with the dissenting opinion, that there is a classic flugelhorn sound.

    However, I also think you should develop your own sound ... on every instrument you play. So overall, I agree with the OP.

    Mike
     

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