How can I improve my practice routine?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Vstern, Apr 30, 2011.

  1. JNINWI

    JNINWI Piano User

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    Apr 26, 2011
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    Thanks Myszolow !! Comebackid recently wrote in another post (my hat is off to him, great statement)
    He was talking about practice and said “That is what trumpet playing is all about. That is why only a special few play and everyone else listens to us.” How right he is !! If it were easy everyone would play trumpet because they are THAT enjoyable to play. Trumpet players that reach their potential on the horn do so because they understand that playing is all about Patience, Dedication and a life long commitment. I don’t mean to make it sound unappealing, if you have these qualities you will no doubt reach a potential only a few have reached. About the “Hard” you mentioned. Being the best I can be on the horn is one of the hardest challenges I’ve faced in my life, you never stop learning, but the rewards of playing at this level are something I can’t put into words. The feeling is incredible, the horn has taken me to places I would have never gone to and introduced me to people I never would have met. It introduced me to my fiancé, and it saved my brothers life. Believe me Myszolow, it’s worth every Hard….Un-appealing minute of it !! :thumbsup:

    Jack
     
  2. Myszolow

    Myszolow Pianissimo User

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    Apr 23, 2011


    That sounds a bit conceited to me to be honest. :dontknow:
    But I guess, nobody blows their own trumpet better than a trumpet player. :play:



    It may be to you. And don't get me wrong. All those things are good. I'm coming back after a 30 year layoff (see my lifelong commitment :roll:), and I'm doing it for fun. To me, trumpet playing is about making a nice musical sound.


    I did the intensive music school thing from age 9-13. International concert tours, TV, radio, records. This was choir, but got up to grade V trumpet and theory during this time. Then quit. Burnout at 12? :dontknow: Perhaps just bored?


    Awesome Jack. Very pleased for you that so much good came out of it. :thumbsup: I'm just playing for fun these days and trying to get good enough to play in church. I don't have any higher ambitions than that.
     
  3. JNINWI

    JNINWI Piano User

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    Apr 26, 2011
    Earth
    Wow, burn out at 12... but it's evident that you know what you want out of the horn. Thats great. I guess we all have different ambitions when it comes down to it. I'm challenge oriented, probably to a fault : ) So personally I'm looking for more out of it. I wish you luck, and happy playing brother Myszolow. Churches are a rewarding place to play !
     
  4. Vstern

    Vstern New Friend

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    Jul 25, 2010
    The reason I run through all the pieces is that I have no troubling sections in any of them. I know the rhythms and notes, but can't play the highest notes consistently- I may need to attack it a few times. I do admit that running through all the pieces in one go is not the best of ideas.

    My lower range is okay. Unless I have to frequently go between mid-high range and low range (G above staff to C below staff), low notes are okay for me. In fact, lower notes are sometimes flat for me because my lower range used to be very sharp, now automatically I think to relax when attacking low notes.
     
  5. Vstern

    Vstern New Friend

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    Jul 25, 2010
    By "five minutes," I mean I hold out the note for about 10-30s at a time, doing that for about five minutes total.
     
  6. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    Your routine, if that's all your practices consist of, looks sorely lacking. Do you do traditional technical drills from books like Arban's and the Clarke Technical Studies?

    Range isn't going to be improved by running through the music. If the music is under your fingers except for the higher range stuff, then stop wasting your time on it and start digging into some real work. If you don't have a Clarke Technical Studies book, Arban's book, Herring Etudes, etc, GET THEM. (There is a whole slew of books you can learn from: Irons, Arban, Clarke, Herring, St. Jacomb, etc, etc - I only mentioned ones that I still work out of consistently.)

    It might also behoove you, if you can and have the means, to start studying with a private instructor. They can give you direct advice based on what you need (information they garner from watching and hearing you play) and that will streamline your approach so that you are practicing the right things, you are practicing correctly, and so that you aren't developing bad habits that will be hard to break later down the road.

    Touching back on range, the more you play and the more you focus and develop your chops, the less of an issue the range will be. Up to a point it will develop on its own if you are putting in the right kind of work elsewhere.
     
  7. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    Looking back over my last post, it comes off a bit harsh - not intended that way at all. The thing is, if you don't know, it's good that you are asking.

    It has always been my experience that diligent, regular work on the basics - sound production/breathing, articulation, flexibilities, scales and scale patterns - helps tremendously and it cross applies to everything you do musically with the trumpet. When you stop and break it down, all of trumpet playing is comprised of some basic building blocks, and even simple exercises - single tonguing up and down a chromatic scale for instance - does wonders to tighten up your playing if you work on it in a dilligent, focused way.

    I'm also of the belief that you can't really build chops with just an hour a day. Maybe a concentrated hour on top of daily rehearsals in other ensembles, but to build chops, an hour broken out the way yours is just won't do it. I'm also of the belief that practice works best if broken out into multiple smaller routines rather than to try to hit it all in one sitting.

    Good luck with everything and keep us posted on your progress! :-)
     

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