how do I get confidence in slotting my notes?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by HSOtrumpet1, Dec 16, 2008.

  1. HSOtrumpet1

    HSOtrumpet1 Pianissimo User

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    Nov 28, 2008
    Michigan
    In a concert I was recently in, I started on a high F sharp. The peice was March Racoczy, or March Hongroise by H. Berlioz. Anyway, this beginning was supposed to be a very important part, the fanfare that starts off the piece. I didn't mess it up, but it was a near miss( I was close to playing a D sharp) Do any people out here have any suggestions for me about how to accurately slot the note and be confident about what pitch is going to come out of my bell? Is it just that my lips do not know where the notes are and I need to spend more time on octave slurs? I would prefer not to be cracking the high A's, and making F sharps into E flats, for example. Is there a better way to gain confidence and embrochure so that when I try to play an F sharp, I can be sure that a D sharp won't come out? Thanks, HSO
     
  2. Snorglorf

    Snorglorf Pianissimo User

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    Nov 13, 2008
    F sharp above the C above the staff? or F sharp at the top of the staff?
     
  3. Solar Bell

    Solar Bell Moderator Staff Member

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    Metro Detroit
    practice!!!
     
  4. et_mike

    et_mike Mezzo Forte User

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    :thumbsup: amatures practice until they get it right.... professionals practice until they can't get it wrong.
     
  5. mlagatic

    mlagatic New Friend

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    Mar 24, 2007
    Northern NJ
    To me there are two things that you need to do to remedy this problem. I would suggest doing a lot of things to train your ears. Go to a piano, play random pitches, and then match them by singing. Incorporate more mouthpiece buzzing along with a piano in your practice. For example, play the melody with one hand (if you're like me and your piano skills are lacking then it will be slow) and buzz along to what you hear. Do this transposed and if you want in concert pitch, it will train your ears for sure.

    The other main concept about not cracking notes is that your lips have to have a muscle memory for each and every pitch you have at your disposal on the trumpet. If you don't normally crack an F# in the staff but crack the F# an octave above its because you either dont have the embochoure strength, and/or you don't have the muscle memory. My teacher had me do an exercise like this to work on muscle memory. Play any note you wish that you know is comfortable to you. let's say in this case it's second line g. Now put the horn down off of your face, hear the pitch an octave above it and put the horn up to your face. Breathe, Set, Play. If it comes out great. Put the horn down off of your face and try a new note, first comfortable, then another octave up or down. If the note doesn't come out, don't keep trying to play it, you'll only teach your chops bad habits. Take the horn back off of your face, and repeat the same process.

    Do this for a week or so in and around the area of your trouble note. Work on the trouble note, work on a few below it, and a few above it as well. Remember to take the horn off your face and reset the chops every time you go to play a note. Best of luck, let me know if this helps you.
     
  6. mlagatic

    mlagatic New Friend

    34
    0
    Mar 24, 2007
    Northern NJ
    To me there are two things that you need to do to remedy this problem. I would suggest doing a lot of things to train your ears. Go to a piano, play random pitches, and then match them by singing. Incorporate more mouthpiece buzzing along with a piano in your practice. For example, play the melody with one hand (if you're like me and your piano skills are lacking then it will be slow) and buzz along to what you hear. Do this transposed and if you want in concert pitch, it will train your ears for sure.

    The other main concept about not cracking notes is that your lips have to have a muscle memory for each and every pitch you have at your disposal on the trumpet. If you don't normally crack an F# in the staff but crack the F# an octave above its because you either dont have the embochoure strength, and/or you don't have the muscle memory. My teacher had me do an exercise like this to work on muscle memory. Play any note you wish that you know is comfortable to you. let's say in this case it's second line g. Now put the horn down off of your face, hear the pitch an octave above it and put the horn up to your face. Breathe, Set, Play. If it comes out great. Put the horn down off of your face and try a new note, first comfortable, then another octave up or down. If the note doesn't come out, don't keep trying to play it, you'll only teach your chops bad habits. Take the horn back off of your face, and repeat the same process.

    Do this for a week or so in and around the area of your trouble note. Work on the trouble note, work on a few below it, and a few above it as well. Remember to take the horn off your face and reset the chops every time you go to play a note. Best of luck, let me know if this helps you.
     
  7. gbdeamer

    gbdeamer Forte User

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    Oct 16, 2008
    The advice so far is spot-on (particularly the one about practice).

    For the short term, if it's just that one note, I would suggest practicing it constantly. That would be the first and last note I played every day...
     
  8. tonybaloney

    tonybaloney Pianissimo User

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    Oct 8, 2008
    Arlington
    You seem like you have good chops. It's probably just not hearing the note before you play it. You must hear the note before you play it.
     
  9. wiseone2

    wiseone2 Artitst in Residence Staff Member

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    Nov 19, 2003
    Brooklyn,NY
    This is a favorite work in the repertoire. It is in E trumpet. The first note is a third space C in E trumpet (fifth line F#), it is not a difficult note to play when using a Bb trumpet. Practice the exercises on page 155 in the Arban book a half step higher than written, this is a good study for triple tonguing F#s.
    Wilmer
     
  10. wiseone2

    wiseone2 Artitst in Residence Staff Member

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    Nov 19, 2003
    Brooklyn,NY
    I just had a flash.......The Damnation of Faust parts are in C trumpet and A cornet. I don't know if you are using a transposed part:dontknow:
    The Arban studies will work never the less.
    Wilmer
     

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