how do i improve my upper range and tone there?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by lilbink93, Jul 3, 2011.

  1. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    I agree, when it comes to getting the blood flow to the lips long tones are an equal opportunity frequency provider.
     
  2. ca5tr0

    ca5tr0 New Friend

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    Rowuk,

    I get at what you are saying, but... Young players tend to do WHAT EVER they can to get the note out. That creates a problem. Pinching, excessive MP pressure, and a series of bad habits tend to form with trying to hold a note out. Long tones are great once you get familiar enough with the note you are trying to play. I personally feel and have witnessed an extensive amount of improvement in ease of playing and flexibility by using the slur. Once you can slur cleanly to and from the note comes difficult task of putting soul and musicality to the high note... I went through the same problem, and have seen others go through the same problem. My trumpet instructor Mike Yopp, a professional trumpeter, saved my bad habits and taught me this. I have now used it in my personal teachings with clinics and instruction to high school bands. I don't just focus on getting there, I really build their chops with these "slurs" as you say....

    Everyone has their own method of practice some right, some kind of right, and some totally wrong. It's just a matter of what works for you and whether you are causing any damage to your chops by doing so.

    You can criticize and refute what I or anyone else on this forum can write, but at the end of the day all of us are only providing our own experiences and our knowledge to help those who request suggestions.
     
  3. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    But long tones at that range will enhance the muscle memory at that level of muscle function, where slurring will bend muscle toward the tension needed. Either will develop muscle, but long tones will develop accuracy.
     
  4. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    C,
    you missed the entire point. Slurs do not transfer to music. Slurs do not build muscle memory. They ARE an important part of building chops, but only in context and definitely not isolated.

    I will disagree with "everyone having their own way". All teaching is based on similar elements passed down over centuries. Some teachers have a bigger pool of tidbits than others - does that make them better? No, but teachers that are unable to take a step back and perhaps see something that they are missing I personally consider to be dangerous. If long tones are not a major part of your teaching, you are missing something big time. They produce fast results in controlled breathing, intonation, controlled chops, tonal development, can be used for dynamics and articulation too. They provide a premier opportunity for building muscle memory.

    Instead of being defensive, run with the additional knowledge - it works, really. The sooner kids learn to work with long tones, the easier it is to communicate things just by playing instead of long explanations. During lessons we play different longtones at the same time. The ear training (not just intonation, but also full sound and getting the chords to really buzz with more resonance) alone makes these things valuable.

    Criticism from me is never there to disqualify (unless something is really ridiculous), rather to offer what I consider to be a bigger picture. Most of the time this helps the teacher as well as the student.

     
  5. vern

    vern Piano User

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    I'm an amateur so take this with a grain of salt but......last week I played a solo for my trumpet teacher on the C-trumpet that, near the end, has a high "C". He said my high "C" is outstanding/beautiful. Where did that high "C" come from? All I did was practice my Clarke/Arban/Schlossberg/Stamp and scales as high/low as I can every day. Like transposition, I suspect there are no secrets other than practice and hard work. Thanks rowuk
     
  6. ca5tr0

    ca5tr0 New Friend

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    Rowuk,

    I do indeed include, and stress to my pupils to play lots of long tones, but when it comes to building or strengthening, I use lots of slurs. Once Slurring is comfortable in a certain range, I work long tones with varieties in dynamics, expression, and other musical aspects. I don't bash long tones, actually I warm up with a half hour of long tones in the low, mid, and high range. What he asked was how he could help improve the ease of playing in the high range, and my advice was to work on slurs. They work your flexibility, which is crucial in playing in any range.

    I admire your advice, but I was only including my own. Yes, I also said that in my perspective long tones aren't everything, but everyone should know that long tones are the polisher of anything that you practice on.

    I conclude, slurring to strengthen your chops works for me, and yes I play long tones after I do that.
     
  7. frankmike

    frankmike Piano User

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    Jon Faddis is the master of high tones. According to Faddis, you should start high -but where you are comfortable -I suppose 3rd space C would do it. And than play major triad up to G -So it is C-E-G, G-E-C first slurred than tongued, than move on to #C triad, than D and so on

    Play soft, ppp at first than move to mf -but do not go beyonf mf

    For changing the pitch use

    1)lip to lip compression 50%
    2)corner tension 25%
    3)tongue level 25%
    4)mpc pressure 0%

    and keep the constant air flow
     
    Last edited: Jul 25, 2011
    ca5tr0 likes this.
  8. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Yeah, and strap on meters to measure and insure the balance. I will disagree with every number. Mouthpiece pressure is necessary to keep the 3 bar necessary for a really loud double C from leaking. The horn will prevent constant airflow. The muscles do not work on percentages. Neither does moving forward.
     
    Last edited: Jul 25, 2011
  9. gzent

    gzent Fortissimo User

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    +1

    People who take "zero pressure" literally are following a myth.

    Of course, you don't want to cram the mouthpiece into your lips any more than is needed, but the higher you go the more pressure you will need to attain the pressure inside the mouthpiece which enables the "double high" notes.

    Its physics, and no amount of exercises will eliminate the need for greater pressure as you reach for the sky.
     

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