How do I improve...?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Heavens2kadonka, Jul 20, 2004.

  1. Heavens2kadonka

    Heavens2kadonka Forte User

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    Jun 17, 2004
    Lebanon, TN
    This summer, I have managed to improve my range considerably, but have stumbled upon a new problem in the process: After consistent playing in the higher register (For me, the second octave E to C), any immediate change in range to the lower octave (From Low C down) comes out very poorly, usually with nothing produced at all!

    So, how do I improve the ability to play lower notes with tone after playing the higher notes? Is there any particular exercises I should look up? Any personal practice routines anyone here found to improve it?
     
  2. JHarris

    JHarris New Friend

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    Jul 13, 2004
    The reson to your problem is how yooou practice the upper stuff.
    How do you practice the high parts?

    I use scales and arpegios becuase you learn how to jump around in al reg. WHILE improveing my range.

    At the begining of may i had a shaky high c, as of the end of june i have a strong e(i am not kidding, if i was i woul only be hearting myself). Course i havent practice this month du o vaction and oral surgery but still.

    How do YOU practice the high reg.?
    Maybe you press too hard, after playing high for a long marching band rehersal i have truble playing low

    Good luck,
    JHARRIS
     
  3. Heavens2kadonka

    Heavens2kadonka Forte User

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    Ah, I do clarke, and slurs, and anything low, I like to take up an octave sometimes (when I feel like a nut, sometimes I don't :D ). I have an excellent-sounding C, an alright D, and past E it cuts off...usually (I praise God whenever the F sounds, heh).

    I guess what I was meaning to ask was after consistant playing of the higher register, I have a lot of trouble quickly going back into the lower register. I guess my best example is the Herring Advanced Etudes. On #2 (My favorite), the last 1/4 of the etude goes into A-G octave jumps/sixteenth note runs down for two phrases, before suddenly switching into slurs from low C to A below staff, staying below the first octave for the remainder of the piece. I have an INCREDIBLE amount of trouble with the quick transition from consistent high to sudden low. I didn't notice this problem until I purchased Herring Advanced two weeks ago, actually.

    I practice about an hour to an hour a half a day, spread out in three thirty-minute intervals, although I have had to make it two 45-minutes as of late, due to screwed-up internal clock (I need more iron, I sleep WAAY too much!). I warm up a number of ways, though I sometimes neglect to warm-down properly. I have been taking it easy for about a week, due to a hole I developed on the inside of my lip...
     
  4. JHarris

    JHarris New Friend

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    Jul 13, 2004
    Arpeggios, go up, go down.

    Scales, go up, go down.

    You say two 45 min things, do you rest, what helps me with myt range is that i play for 20 mins then rest for 10.
     
  5. Heavens2kadonka

    Heavens2kadonka Forte User

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    I didn't think I posted my question correctly, so thats why I went further in explanation (No meaning to insult you or say I didn't believe you, Mr. Harris). I guess I do need to do more of the not-so-fun-damentals (geh, corney!). Thanks for the help!
     
  6. JHarris

    JHarris New Friend

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    Jul 13, 2004
    I have never heard of the book but perhaps that is what the book is sopost to do. You have only had the book for a week. Give it time. I have a book called...let me find it....

    Twenty-Seven Groups of Exercises for Cornet and Trumpet by Earl D. Irons. This book is probably the BEST book for slurring. At first it was easy but then it WAS HARD to do. But i started slow and then worked faster. Now the book is very simple for e to work through. Give the book some time and will become easyer for you.

    Jharris
     
  7. Heavens2kadonka

    Heavens2kadonka Forte User

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    I actually have played out of that book. Yes, it is excellent for slurrings (lotta repetitions, but sometimes thats what you need!).

    ......Why don't I own that book!?!??! :shock:
     
  8. dcstep

    dcstep Mezzo Piano User

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    Nov 27, 2003
    Denver
    Well, I think that playing music or etudes in the upper register is better than playing arpeggios and scales into and out of the upper register. With arpeggios and scales you always progress into and out of the register in a progressive way, where with music you need to move around in a musical way.

    Also, practice the upper register whisper-quiet. That'll force you to control the embouchure and work with small, precise aperture adjustments rather than "blasting" you way into the register.

    This is not to say that arpeggios, particularly downward, slurred arpeggios don't have a place in addressing this problem. I suspect you're practicing hard and loud up there and either stiffening your lip with overwork or smashing your lip with too much pressure. The whisper-quiet practice and playing something simple and musical up there will help. Even with whisper-quiet practice, you'll need to rest frequently to allow the blood back in and the muscle to recover.

    Pick simple songs like Londonderry Aire, Greensleeves, etc.

    Dave
     

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