How do you "consider" a horn you've never played?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by amzi, Jul 24, 2013.

  1. Comeback

    Comeback Forte User

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    I don't know, Greg, is it really a common view on TM that Strads are a crap shoot or is this just something a few of us enjoy repeating? I certainly respect your right to make such a statement, but there sure are a lot of Strads being played by excellent trumpeters, both amateur and pro. Since I purchased my 180S37 in November of 2012 any symptoms of N+1 I had previously have pretty much dissipated, and I bought mine off ebay unplayed, but thoroughly researched, just like my previous ebay trumpet purchases. In fact, since acquiring the Strad, I've reduced the number of Bb trumpets I own from six to three, and in the course of time I may sell one more; I just had no more need of those that were sold.

    I think you have had more experience than me with various trumpets. But I have found that frequently a negative impression formed from playing a trumpet with one mouthpiece became positive after playing it with one better suited to it. I often wonder how often trumpeters become dismissive about instruments prematurely.

    Jim
     
    Last edited: Jul 26, 2013
  2. gzent

    gzent Fortissimo User

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    Jim:

    I wasn't trying to divert the thread into a discussion about Strads.
    I was just saying that I heard it said enough times about Strads that I no longer would
    consider buying one.

    Greg
     
  3. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    I too was of the same mind when it comes to Strads. I still think there is a lot of hype that has developed just because of tradition. That said, I had the opportunity to buy a'72 Strad w/37 bell for a very,very, very low price. I still looked at it and played it 1st and then I bought it. It is a very good horn and after researching it's history, I've discovered why the early Elkhardt Strads have a good reputation. The skilled craftsmen were from Conn and Selmer! That doesn't guarantee every Strad of that vintage will be great, but the chances of it being a dud are much, much lower. I'm keeping my Strad!
     
  4. amzi

    amzi Forte User

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    Graysono--didn't realize Hornucopia was a brick and mortar store--I'll have to give it a shot. By the way, taking BART to Millbrae is cheaper than stopping at the airport. You can catch a bus right outside the station-I checked and one of the buses takes you right to the address.
    So many interesting opinions--though I may not have stated my original question particularly well. Still not sure I can--but I'll try to clarify it. Why would someone buy (for instance) a Bach Strad 37 ML without ever playing a Bach Strad 37 ML? The person would have no idea of the playing characteristics of the horn. I recently worked with a high school student who was playing a particularly wretched student horn--she wanted to buy a better horn, but had no idea what to buy. I arranged for her to play several modern and classic pro line horns and she fell in love with 2 horns--1 was my Recording Olds, the other was a Bach Strad 37. Unable to afford a restored Recording she opted to a lightly used Strad. She hadn't played the Strad, but she knew what to expect and when she received it she was very pleased. She didn't play the exact horn, but she had played the same make and model horn. Had she purchased a large bore 25 she wouldn't have had the least idea of what she would be getting. Why would anyone consider doing the latter!
     
  5. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    She was a fortunate person. I have heard Strad can vary over the years. The Recordings, they are pretty rock solid from the 1940s through to the 1970s. My 53 LA Recording plays, sounds and feels identical to my 67 Fullerton Recording.
     
  6. stumac

    stumac Fortissimo User

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    Most of my vintage horns I have purchased overseas with no oportunity to try before buying, I have never been dissapointed with any purchase.

    The nearest I have come to dissapointment was with a Mt Vernon Bach LB, purchased from a local dealer, did not have much of a play in the shop, when I got it home and played it for a while I began to wonder what the hype was about. The horn had been serviced by the shop and new felts and corks fitted, checking the valve alignment and replacing the new washers with ones of the correct thickness made a completly different player.

    Going with the courage of my convictions a recent purchase of a 1960s Buffet Crampon Balanced model is one of the best players in my collection, I use it in Big Band.

    Waiting on a 1930s King Silver Tone Liberty on its way, I am sure I wont be dissapointed.

    Regards, Stuart.
     
  7. Comeback

    Comeback Forte User

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    Fort Wayne, IN
    Some of us buy into the idea that 90 percent or so of our playing experience is us, 6 or 7 percent mouthpiece, with the remainder trumpet, so obsessing overmuch about trumpets, while interesting, does not seem so important. Others of us look at things differently. I believe that, where practIcal, trying before buying is great. But, given that mouthpieces affect trumpet performance hugely, giving a horn a thorough trial in ten minutes in a shop with a single mouthpiece may not reveal too much.

    Jim
     
  8. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    sadly I have to say -- a trumpet is just a trumpet -- you can (if skilled enough) get the notes out of almost any trumpet, it will play!!! and it will (generally) sound like a trumpet. NOW having said that -- you might find one, that is easier to play, sounds better for your genre of music, or just "feels" better to play or hang onto. ----- so I ended up buying 7 trumpet, 2 cornets, in my 5 year comeback. KING trumpets are the thing for me, I LIKE them -- followed closely by FE Olds equipment. (((why, would I buy all these horns without trying?? -- cause they were cheap enough, it gave me an opportunity to use them for different circumstances, different songs, different moods, over a LONGER period than just going to a music store when MY ADRENALINE was pumped up and I was looking for one trumpet that day))) -- so I gravitated to FE OLDS and KINGS (yeah, I got Holton, Conn, Reynolds - they are good horns) ---
     
  9. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Ahhh, can I get a thank you here... as it was me that turned you on to Olds... admit it KT... common...

    Can I get a witness!!!
     
  10. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    YES, GM ole buddy, ole pal --- if it wasn't for you, I would NOT have latched onto the OLDS SUPER (which is a nice horn)- - and to follow that up, I would NOT have gotten the FE OLDS Ambassador Trombone a year and a half ago, when I decided to double ---- and if I HAD NOT GOTTEN an OLDS TROM -- I might have failed at the sliding trombone thing, cause everyone KNOWS it's all about the instrument!!!!!! ROFL ROFL ROFL
     

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