How do you Finish a Note Cleanly?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Sethoflagos, Mar 23, 2015.

  1. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I use speech as my articulation model. How do we stop the e in ME? The a in BLAH? What does a t, k, d, g, n, r, l sound like? I really never spent time thinking about how, I played hymns while reading the lyrics. That is how I teach today. Everything from clouds to flamethrowers. Oh, yeah, for some controversy, the glottis is not out of the picture either - at least not in my world.......
     
  2. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

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    Hawaian homey
    Aber, ich habe keine Glottis.

    (...and that's not all!) =:0
     
  3. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    Interesting!

    The 'glottal stop' is a characteristic feature of most of the dialects of our region so it's an articulation that does come naturally. But it was condemned by my brass tutors as 'squeezing' (possibly a symptom of neck tension?) and very much a 'no-no'. I remember much emphasis being placed on keeping the airways as open as possible and maximising the use of open vowels (tow, taa, tuu) to keep full communication between lung and lip.

    But it seems to work well enough. Not sure I'd be keen on letting it become habitual though.
     
  4. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Like anything else good, it has to be earned and it can be very effective. I imagine that many more use it than most think. Considering the broad palette of colors needed to play various styles, even closed vowels can be used to great effect. If we compare Maurice Andrés Hora Legato and compare it to Méndèzs Hora Staccato, we can discover howm much ground that there is to cover to become the "consummate" trumpeter.

     
  5. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    This is the way I end a note which I see as the last sound of a spoken phrase. Just like words we fall off OR fad out the last syllable. The tongue rarely ends that last phrase, but in the exclamation: Damn it! The tongue does the work.

    I kind of speak when I play, if there are words to the song, I say the words as I play to assure the phrasing is accurate. So mostly the phrase ends when I diminish the air flow to the point where the sound is no longer heard. In other words, I stop the air flow from the lung by no longer exhaling. If I want to embellish that last phrase after stopping the air flow I will let my cheek muscles mover the air until they stop contracting. Airflow stops, the sound stops. Very much like the spoken word. Very much. So I read and speak the lyrics.
     
  6. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    There's a thought. Hindemith's Sonata played in Yorkshire dialect.

    Didst tha know/This un's a long, 'ard soddin' blow
     
  7. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Now that's what I call clean... Real clean!
     
  8. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    Sorry to resurrect this, but I've realised I'd forgotten to get around to the issue that was bugging me at the time.

    How about double-tongued scale runs? (Just what I happen to be working on at the moment)? At the pedestrian speed I'm up to, three different flavours are emerging (in approximate order of ease/'pleasantness'):

    1) A soft-tongued almost legato, where I consciously 'blow through' the articulation.
    2) A more staccato 'clipped' attack, pinched off with the aperture (I think).
    3) AK-47 with more tongue movement - feeling more up/down than backwards/forwards (takataka rather than tukutuku).

    Which (if any) would you regard as 'standard' approach to base further development on (classical genres of course!)
     
  9. Cornyandy

    Cornyandy Fortissimo User

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    Do you realise you can fit those lyrics to the Haydn too
     
  10. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    As I remember, it was "Soft and sweet/Don't try to play too loud, and keep your tonguing neat"
     

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