How do you get the fingers and tongue in sync?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by jcmacman, Jan 3, 2005.

  1. jcmacman

    jcmacman Pianissimo User

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    Dec 10, 2003
    SoCal
    Manny, how do you get the fingers and tongue in sync?

    I can single tongue passage cleanly, but when I try to double tongue them I fall apart. Even if I take the passage real slow.
    Thanks
    John
     
  2. Rick Chartrand

    Rick Chartrand Piano User

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    Nov 22, 2004
    Toronto Canada
    Double tonguing

    Hi

    Double and Tripple Tonguing is one of the hardest things that I have ever mastered on the trumpet, next to the irritating embouchure development nessasary to play properly. the only advice that I have is to get some really good etudes on tonguing and study them long and hard, and do them slowly. Once you get the technique it will be with you for life and will make your technique and style that much better :D

    Rick
     
  3. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    Sep 29, 2004
    USA
    Dear Jmac,

    We're going to do this one step at time because there's no other way for me to help.

    Tonight or whenever the next practice session is, play a triple-tongued C arpeggio from low "C" to high "C" and back down repeatedly and make sure to include the "E"s in both octaves. Fast. Clean but fast.

    Let me know how that goes then we'll move on.

    ML
     
  4. jcmacman

    jcmacman Pianissimo User

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    Dec 10, 2003
    SoCal
    Thanks Manny,
    Did you mean 3 per note: CCC EEE GGG CCC or 1 per note triple tongued?
    John
     
  5. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    JC,

    One note per stroke, like an Arban's solo, virtuoso style.

    ML
     
  6. JackD

    JackD Mezzo Forte User

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    Nov 30, 2003
    Manchester / London
    This is one of the worst aspects of my playing too, so I'm watching this with interest.

    Cheers,

    Jack.
     
  7. jcmacman

    jcmacman Pianissimo User

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    Dec 10, 2003
    SoCal
    Man thats hard to do.

    I can play the excersise going up, but I get "tongue tied" coming down. I am treating them as triplettes, is that right? I find it very difficult even at slow speed, 1/4note=60. After about 15 minutes, I was getting tired and didnot notice any improvment.

    Thanks Manny.
    John
     
  8. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

    5,915
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    Sep 29, 2004
    USA
    Okay,

    This is what I suspected would happen which is why I gave you that little challenge.

    We have an issue that is masking another in your case. The issue that is being masked is that of tightness that doesn't give you the clarity to hear yourself well which is vital to good coordination.

    Go to Arban's page 44 (the slip slurs). Starting with the very first one, set the metronome to quarter = 60. Play but a very legato articulation. Here's your job: each note must sound with the same timbre as the other. That is, play with a TAH or TOH articulation for each note. No TEE, no TIH. I'm going to assume that you are going to take a maximum breath for each one ( no holding the breath before you play, either;
    breatheinbreatheout).

    If you have to stop to breathe in the middle, do so! It's no crime.

    Single, double, and triple tongue as needed. Remember: LEGATISSIMO!

    Let's talk again after a few days of this.


    Wax on, wax off.

    If you don't know what that means, rent the Karate Kid TONIGHT!


    ML
     
  9. jcmacman

    jcmacman Pianissimo User

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    Dec 10, 2003
    SoCal
    Thank you Mr. Miyagi

    In a few days then.
    John

    One of my kids favorite movies!
     
  10. JackD

    JackD Mezzo Forte User

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    Nov 30, 2003
    Manchester / London
    Hi Manny - should the metronome stay at 60? ie. should the double / triple tongues be taken very slowly? I presume you mean start doubling at the semis and tripling at the semi sextuplets ... right?

    Cheers,

    Jack.
     

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