How do you get to play so well?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by bumblebee, Jan 19, 2011.

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  1. Kujo20

    Kujo20 Forte User

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    Thanks for clearing that up Phil. I see where you guys are getting this now.

    Let it be known that I do not believe that because of my one student, anybody can be a great trumpet player. When I used that example I did not mean for it to come across like that. I was simply using an example. However I see that the way I worded it is confusing. I apologize.

    Regardless of the confusing wording and example, I still believe than anybody can work their way up to a professional (great) level and beyond if they really, truly put the work into it.

    Kujo
     
  2. Phil986

    Phil986 Forte User

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    And I would tend to agree with that. Each will go through a unique combination of talent, circumstances and good luck. These are variables that we can not control.

    Anyone who wants to play at a good level must have the dedication and put up with the hard work, because nothing good will happen without them. However, they will take one only as far as the non controllable variables provide.

    All reasonably gifted players can achieve a good level with hard work, I should add intelligent work, and dedication. In that sense you are likely right, if mastery is defined as the ability to function satifactorily in most settings, with various types of music. That would describe a pro.

    But the OP was, I believe, talking about superior levels of mastery, that are only shown by a few exceptional players. Only the very talented will turn hard intelligent work and dedication into that kind of mastery, if circumstances and good luck do not get too much in their way.
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2011
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  3. BigDub

    BigDub Fortissimo User

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    My mistake. I guess the "I disagree" misled me to incorrectly interpret that as an argument.
    The one student you referred to sounds more like a real standout, an exceptional kid, not just anyone, true?
     

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