How do you guys start a new trumpet player?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by cobragamer, Jun 3, 2011.

  1. coolerdave

    coolerdave Utimate User

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    oh no KC.. nwo we are back to the "ten" thing again
     
  2. Bob Grier

    Bob Grier Forte User

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    It sounds like you don't have much experience starting beginners. My best advice is find them a good teacher who knows how to start beginners. You may do more harm than good.
     
  3. Bob Grier

    Bob Grier Forte User

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    My best recommendation is find a teacher who works with comeback players It;s very important for any succes on the horn that you start with the foundation of good playing habits. Learning to play the trumpet is not a DIY endevor. The are just roo many variables (ways to do it wrong).
    I've worked with a lot of adult beginners. Check out my web site.
     
  4. krmanning

    krmanning Pianissimo User

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    Apr 18, 2009
    Fayetteville, NC
    Why the negative feelings about mouthpiece buzzing? I'm a 50 yo comeback player, and I've never been very good at it, but my teacher loves to start each lesson with 5 - 10 minutes of buzzing. I seldom get a good sound out of it and get a bit frustrated each time. Saying that, my tone on my horn is pretty good (maybe a little dark - not a lead sound), and I play well enough to be section leader in our community band and to play the occasional musical or church gig.

    Is mouthpiece buzzing bad, just a waste of time, or detrimental?


    8 horns and counting. So many toys left to get.
     
  5. kctrumpeteer

    kctrumpeteer Piano User

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    IMO I think 10 minutes would be over kill for mouthpiece buzzing. However many people utilize mouthpiece buzzing as part of their warm-up routine, but still somewhere between <= 5 minutes. Another option if you want to work on mp buzzing is to get a BERP tool. The advantages being that you can adjust the resistance and you can have it attached to your horn so you can think about buzzing actual notes and moving your fingers so there is a bit of a more focused approach to buzzing.
     
  6. MTROSTER

    MTROSTER Piano User

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    I would echo Bob Grier's advice to the retired individual seeking information on playing the trumpet. I made the mistake, as a comeback player after a 20 year hiatus, of trying to teach myself. That only created a mess of bad playing and bad habits that took a long time to get rid of. Get a teacher.:play:
     
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2011
  7. MTROSTER

    MTROSTER Piano User

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    This post is off topic, but I don't want to start a new thread. I'm off to Boston for a medical conference and I was wondering if anyone could recommend a good instrument shop to have a boo at their horn collection, as I'm considering adding to my collection. I know about Rayburn music, but is there anyplace else I could try? Thanks.:dontknow:
     
  8. kctrumpeteer

    kctrumpeteer Piano User

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    ... starting a new student... (from an experience last night of watching 20 kids that were 5th-6th grade learn a new instrument for the 1st time)

    breathing, buzzing, tonguing

    And of course the simple things of how to hold the instrument, finger placement, how to and NOT to put the mouthpiece in / out of the instrument (so you don't have a stuck mp in the instrument)

    Then from there a new 'young' student will have several weeks to work on playing notes, working on the embouchure to get it right for higher or lower notes to play in tune. And then some simple tunes.

    I think the only difference in starting a new middle school student is that the adult SHOULD progress faster and so the adult may be able to handle more 'homework' but ultimately no matter what the age is I think the fundamentals need to be taught and establish a foundation for future playing.
     
  9. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    While it certainly isn't easy, a comeback player can achieve favorable results themself and I must say that such depends on mostly on the memories of good prior performance techniques. This said, if such a teacher with experience in comebacks were local enough for me to reasonably get to, even I'd enroll. However, I am very selective and would require a curricula vitae of such a teacher.
     
  10. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    I was sure you always started a trumpet player ----------with a key, ROFL ROFL ROFL
     

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