How do you practice playing with different mouthpieces?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by hhsTrumpet, Feb 2, 2012.

  1. hhsTrumpet

    hhsTrumpet Piano User

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    I use two different mouthpieces for classical and jazz, and I was having no trouble switching back and forth. However, I started to become uncomfortable with my classical mouthpiece. How should I practice playing with different mouthpieces?
     
  2. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    I don't. I pick the one that works best and stick with it. It's all about finding that sweet spot. Why would you want to confuse your lips by changing the way they need to vibrate to best hit that sweet spot? Be kind to your lips, and they will be kind to you. Yeah, I know, you probably think I am just giving you lip service...


    Well you're right... I am!

    Wow, I've been yelling a lot lately today. Not sure why, just got a Chris Botti haircut today and if anything that should have mellowed me out right?
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2012
  3. Mark_Kindy

    Mark_Kindy Mezzo Forte User

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    Well, switching for me has worked fine because I remind myself of this:

    Keep the focus in the center, relax, and use air.

    That seems to carry through to most mouthpieces for me.

    Rowuk will have some good stuff on your question, if he sees it; you can check it in my "Proper Technique/Approach to Shallow Mouthpiece" Thread, he has some words in there.
     
  4. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I disagree with the idea of a "jazz" and legit mouthpiece. There is equipment for playing lead, but that is not restricted to jazz. I use the same mouthpiece for symphony and all the other big band parts. Only when playing lead do I pick a brighter, more aggressive sound.

    I guess you need to explain why, in your case another mouthpiece is necessary. That could offer some insite into why it isn't working.

    I have found that if the musical concept is not in the head, changing the mouthpiece breaks more than it could ever help.
     
  5. Phil986

    Phil986 Forte User

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    OK, pedantic moment from a non English speaker here:
    Sweet, as in nice, good or sugary, not sweat, a bodily secretion. I don't know about you Gary but I have some some sweat points on my t-shirts at the armpit level and I dont' feel the need to hit them...

    Insight as in understanding, comprehension, different from in site, on location. On can have an insight on site, of course...
     
  6. hhsTrumpet

    hhsTrumpet Piano User

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    Well, I have a signature model mouthpiece from a professional jazz player, and i asked my band directer which mouthpiece he prefers for jazz band. He preferred the "jazz mouthpiece", so I'm using it. I can't really use it for classical, because it would be really hard to blend in.
     
  7. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Phil, you are a great editor... I made the change... your visual image of the armpit sweat convinced me to do this... Sorry.
     
  8. Phil986

    Phil986 Forte User

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    No underarm done...:D
     
  9. Local 357

    Local 357 Banned

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    Would be interesting to know the reason you feel "uncomfortable" with the classical mouthpiece. It probably is deeper in cup depth, wider on inside diameter and also likely sharper in the inner rim "bite". Or some combination of the described characteristics. So my question is: What causes the discomfort?

    My guess would be endurance and possibly accuracy. Since the jazz or lead piece is probably smaller you may get used to the favorable leverage the smaller piece has and thus start to fall apart on the bigger classical piece when the physical demands increase.

    Also: using two different mouthpieces is essentially a form of doubling. Not all that different from doubling on Trombone or Euphonium. Just less drastic of a change. Any kind of doubling (like using two mouthpieces) can cause temporary chop confusion. One part of your embouchure may feel swollen from the other mouthpiece and not respond as well. So the solution is careful and diligent practice/performance until a point of consistency is reached.

    Always watch for the condition over training. Pretty much every post I read here containing some physical complaint has over training as much or all of it's cause. And when using two mouthpiece it is easy to over train your chops.

    Conversely switching between mouthpieces if well done is a great way to AVOID OVER TRAINING. The real benefit of multiple mouthpiece training. While there are cats who can blow solid lead and scream work on larger pieces such as Bach 3C most of us would wear ourselves out trying. It is for this reason that I keep most of my "legit" mouthpiece work up to or below the High C. While I could play a screamer chart well with a 3C it would be a beatch of a time finishing a gig that way. And after a couple nights in a row of this I'd be cooked for a week.

    Over training is the most inefficient way of embouchure skill development. And sadly rarely talked about. Most threads that get well read are about trick mouthpieces or new "systems" of chop settings etc. The really helpful threads (like the recent one of Moi's on the twin evils of over training") collect tumbleweeds...
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2012
  10. codyb226

    codyb226 Banned

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    Have you thought of getting a different mouthpiece that is the same rim?

    That is my answer to your question, but im with everyone else here. You dont need another mouthpiece for jazz. The 16C2 is about a Bach 3B, a deep mouthpiece. That will give you a meaty low register and dark tone. You should try a 3C or D for jazz band. I am not telling you to go buy these, I am saying that you should find one and play it.
     

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