How on earth did they do it??

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by motteatoj, Jan 27, 2014.

  1. motteatoj

    motteatoj Mezzo Forte User

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    When i read a lot of the the minutia that is debated on TM, I often ask myself......

    How did all the great, semi-great, professional/non-professionals manage to play well?
    Don't get me wrong, I am an engineer & research scientist, and I get very interested and caught up in it all as well, but really......some of this stuff just doesn't matter.....

    Discuss...
     
  2. Lionelsax

    Lionelsax Mezzo Piano User

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    Good musicians, acceptable sound or nice sound, the rhythm is more important than everything, "playing square", good microphones, good equalization, some reverb when it's a bit out of tune.
    Rhythm is the most important, playing a bad note in rhythm with the right articulation is better than playing a good note out of rhythm.
     
  3. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    They all have this in common: They play a lot. I am a real fan of the 10,000 times rule. Anybody that does anything 10,000 times has got to be a pro.

    I too am a chemist, a PhD chemist. I never ran 10,000 reactions so even with a PhD, I feel mediocre as a chemist at best.
    I am a physician, and doubt I have not come close to seeing 10,000 patients, so indeed, I still practice, until I get it right.
    As a musician, I have been playing since age 7. I have played nearly every day of my life, and with my 50+ years of playing trumpet, I calculate out to 18,250 times that I have played, and I do feel very accomplished as a musician.

    So after a PhD in chemistry, MD in medicine, and only minoring in music as an undergrad, reflecting on this post for me truly validates that 10,000 time rule. Thanks for thinking up such a wonderful post. I now feel validated.
     
  4. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    With 12,743 posts on TM, I believe that validates me as providing spot on information here on TM as well.

    You guys/gals do not need to say thinks, but rather all of you, just hit that rep point button. That's all the validation I really need.
     
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  5. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    No.
     
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  6. motteatoj

    motteatoj Mezzo Forte User

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    close but not quite....Malcolm Gladwell's theory is 10,000 hours, not times.....and that is to become a phenom, not an expert.....keep posting, you might get there one day...
     
  7. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Well then that makes me phenomonal in everything I do, because as a chemists, my reactions went slow, real slow. I believe 1 I can recall alone took 10,000 hours, and for all I know my still be going on in the 3rd Floor Chemistry Lab of Richard Elder at the University of Cincinnati.

    As a physician, I very much feel I have clocked in at 10,000 hours of patient visits, at least if feels that way, and THAT'S just for this week.

    And since I usually make it to 2 hours a day practicing my horns, that doubles my 18,250 estimate, so yeah, I have achieved phenomonal accomplishments in everything I do as a professional. Thanks for this validation as well.
     
  8. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    I believe I met your phenom requirement on TM. Just ask VB, he will tell you he has spent 10,000 hours reading and dealing with my posts alone... so that rep button, yep, bottom left corner of this post. I am waiting for that validation:wub:
     
  9. VetPsychWars

    VetPsychWars Fortissimo User

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    For every trumpet player you've actually heard of, there were 10,000 that you didn't. What we call today the "truly great" were players who had enormous natural ability and they practiced a lot (no Internet or TV to distract them).

    Tom
     
  10. veery715

    veery715 Utimate User

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    Quality trumps quantity every day of the week.
     

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