How Quick To Get the Chops Back?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by trickg, Sep 17, 2012.

  1. DaTrump

    DaTrump Forte User

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    Yeah, they are nice snares, most guys I know use DW, to me the Pork Pie projects much better, I like the tone too.

    And those are some really thin heads though. Do you have two heads per gig? :-)
     
  2. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    I don't play hard enough to need to replace my heads in the middle of a gig - I only replace heads about once every 6 months or so for the toms, when they go dead on my snares, and only once every couple of years for my kick drum.

    My current lineup of snares:

    5x14 Ludwig Acrolite - refinished with tube lugs and painted with hammered metalic black effects paint.
    5.5x14 Pearl Sensitone Elite in Phosphor Bronze
    6x14 Keller maple shelled snare I made myself (this is kind of my go-to snare)
    6x14 Pork Pie Little Squealer

    I have two more Acrolite shells I'm going to use as project shells - still haven't decided what I'm going to do with them since they will primarily be cosmetic changes - the seamless spun aluminum shell sounds great though.
     
  3. DaTrump

    DaTrump Forte User

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    You seem to really like your metal drums, I'm more of a wood kind of guy. Yeah, you get less sound but, to me, wood sounds better.
     
  4. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    True, but as you can see, I mentioned my 6x14 Keller shell maple as my go-to snare. I got the bronze Sensitone thinking that was going to be it, THE snare drum, but overall it's the drum in my arsenal I like the least. The Acrolite I got because it was a deal I couldn't pass on. It was sitting there looking pathetic in a music store with a price tag of just $30 because it was all dirty and crusty, but the shell was in perfect shape, so I snagged it to make it a project snare. I like this drum because it prints really well to mic, either live or recorded - it just has a bite to it that works.

    Ok - day 3 of my comeback, and I got some more news today that this gig might actually happen, but if it does, it's a few weeks away, which is good from a chops perspective.
     
  5. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    I carried the drums once in my community band (from the van to the concert hall) -- but I dropped a stick --- and they immediately said, "I was conductor material" --- ROFL ROFL ROFL
     
  6. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    So day #3 is in the bag. I pushed it a bit harder tonight and played through a lot of the old wedding band music with the recordings. I was pleasantly surprised by how much I was hitting, but also not surprised when my endurance started to flag out. I like playing like this because of a couple of reasons.

    1.) In the past I have been plagued by the difference between practice room chops and gig chops, and by playing along with recordings, it seems to mitigate that a bit so that things remain consistent between the two places.

    2.) I have built in rest periods most of the time with the natural rests that occur in the music, which gives me an idea of what my endurance is going to be like on the gig.

    I left real chop killers alone though and just worked some of the other boilerplate stuff that I knew was within my ability to play without pushing harder than I should. Tonight was just about rolling through some tunes. Tomorrow I'll be back to fundamentals.
     
  7. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    I'm not surprised that drummers are such gearheads ... kits are like huge tinker toy sets that you get to arrange and put together, before you play it. They're such gearheads because there's SO MUCH GEAR!!! :lol:

    Btw, I use wood sticks.


    Turtle
     
  8. coolerdave

    coolerdave Utimate User

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    San Pedro
    Well now I see why you weren't practicing as much .. all those drum projects.
    I saw the drum head tuner for the first time the other day. I can't believe no one thought of it sooner.
    Thanks for the info..
    I think our drummer used 1A's back in the day... talk about loud
    Did I happen to mention Arbans pg 125 :)
     
  9. kctrumpeteer

    kctrumpeteer Piano User

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    Dec 23, 2009
    I think part of it depends on your expectations... Getting your chops back to your consistent gigging days is very different from someone getting chops back for a community band that they play in part time. I think from your experience that you will have your chops back in no time but to your personal expectations may take longer. My experience has told me to find my point that I'm not being successful anymore in regards to chops and to stop and either wait till a different time in the day or come back to it the next day. I think over pushing could make it worse.
     
  10. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    I agree - pushing too hard too fast is not the answer, but I also think that my quickest way back is going to be really mixing up what I'm doing with the horn. Last night was all music, and specifically the tunes that I used to play in the wedding band, but I don't think that doing that every day is a good approach. True, I was playing music, thinking about phrasing and even getting some technical work on a few of the tougher licks here and there, but I think that the chops are a bit like the body. If you keep them a bit confused and off balance (think P90X) progress will actually be faster. Some days I'll need to just work the basics of tone production, articulation, flexibilties, etc.

    Last night's practice was very encouraging because when you think about it, the whole point of practicing and playing an instrument is to make music, and on that end I was doing pretty well. Another aspect that I wanted to try to work by pulling up some of that old music is that sometimes if a person allows reflex and muscle memory to take over, they get out of their own way. I've been playing some of those tunes for 10 years, so I just kind of got out of the way let my body and chops remember what they were supposed to do. Of course it didn't always work, but it was pretty danged close on some of it, and that was also good for my confidence.
     

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