How should I approach double-tonguing?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by matt408, Oct 10, 2015.

  1. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I start my students with double tonguing from the very beginning - third lesson or so.

    The biggest killer for multiple tonguing is a screwed up embouchure. If the player is using a lot of chop tension, it is almost impossible to get the Ku to ignite the lips.

    I always start with exhaled long tones - no articulation. Inhale, exhale, inhale, exhale through the mouthpiece. When the lips respond and easily produce sound, then we can add an articulated T precisely at the point between inhale and exhale. Once that works, we replace the T with a K. Once that works (days? weeks? months?), we alternate whole notes started with a T then a K. We do NOT concentrate on the articulation, rather keeping the relaxed airflow. As our reliability with whole notes improves, we move to halfs, then quarters. WE NEVER START THE NEXT STEP UP BEFORE THE CURRENT ONE IS MASTERED!!!!!!

    The tongue rides on air. That is why we need the low tension embouchure before starting multiple tonguing!
     
  2. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    ...another is if your dialect tends to articulate 'k' in the throat rather than on the hard palate. Took me nearly 50 years to discover that little gem.
     
  3. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Hmmm, never ran into this. Wonder how the Swiss manage? Have to look at this more closely. Thanks!

    I still maintain that if the lips ignite easily, even a cough (throat "K") would work, just not be very fast or nice sounding........

     
  4. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    Your presumption is entirely correct.
     
  5. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Especially with new music, I throat hum and get my lips really vibrating a buzz. This is not the type of hum that goes to the nose and ears with the lips closed. My double and triple tonguing is just that, a controlled flutter of the tongue.
     
  6. gunshowtickets

    gunshowtickets Forte User

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    You're probably thinking in terms of 'murkan "koo" as you say it. Just like with "tu", you have to think like a Frenchman saying both of those syllables.
     
  7. matt408

    matt408 New Friend

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    Do you mean making sound by just blowing without any Tu or Ku? If so, yes I could do that. I'm not sure if I should be blowing air and practicing stopping it temporarily with the Ku or I should be starting an air stream with a Ku.
     
  8. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Ku "starts" the note, although in practice it interrupts the airstream.
     
  9. gunshowtickets

    gunshowtickets Forte User

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    I don't know of any pedagogy using "ku" to start a phrase, it's always "tu". What I meant was we, having learned Germanic syllables in American Standard or the Queen's English, have a very different perception of the what the syllables "tu" and "ku" sound like when we say them. You're seeing syllables written on a page and I did too. It's not until recently have I learned to read Arban's in context and it makes a world of difference in tone production.

    The "tah"/"kah" syllables result in a flat tongue, like what a beginner sounds like, a sound I don't particularly care for from an advanced trumpeter.
    The French "tu", started with the tip of your tongue just about even with the bottom of the back of your top incisors and just touching the bottom of the back of your top gums, it's more of a "tyü" and "kü" and your tongue should be a bit U-shaped side to side, funneling the air toward your aperture.

    This is all complicated stuff and can't really be conveyed across the internet, especially if we can't hear you play. The best advice is to find yourself a solid tutor.



    I probably should have adhered to my initial response, a singular word to answer the question of how to approach double-tonguing: slowly.
     

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