How to convert to closed apreture setting?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by bach2112, Mar 8, 2015.

  1. bach2112

    bach2112 New Friend

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    Jun 12, 2010
    I have been told that when starting a note on my trumpet, right off the bat, i have my lips too far appart. I rely on the resistance of the mouthpiece and horn to make my lips touch and create a buzz, which i know is not very efficient or correct. So i have been working on trying to play with a closed apreture, by free buzzing and doing very quiet long tones. But i notice when set my mouthpiece my lips are touching and i breathe through the corners of my mouth, but when i go to attack my note, my tongue goes between my teeth and opens my lips, creating an open apreture and then i end up playing with an open apreture again. How can i stop this habbit i have? And what can i do to ensure i learn to play with a closed apreture? Maybe the warburton atv can help? Or something? Im not really sure, but i would love to hear feedback.
    Thank you,
    Brian:play:
     
  2. stumac

    stumac Fortissimo User

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    Firstly, the aperture must be open to let the air through, secondly were you taught to tongue through your teeth as spitting off the tip of the tongue as I was 70 years ago?

    I do not free buzz the lips as I feel this introduces too much tension, with relaxed closed lips practice breath starts without the tongue, this allows the lips to respond to the resonance of the horn. When you have mastered this, move on to using the tongue, not with a forward/backward movement but an up and down movement, by placing the tip behind the lower teeth and using the center or with the tip behind the upper teeth and falling to start the air flow.

    Also look at Rowuk,s circle of breath and any of his other posts, all good information.

    Regards, Stuart.
     
  3. jengstrom

    jengstrom Pianissimo User

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    Stumac's suggestion to look for Rowuk's "Circle of Breath" is a very good one.

    I also have another suggestion. Set your chops to play a pp note somewhere near the top of the staff. Either E or G would be fine. Try this a few times until you are able to start the note cleanly at pp. Now, without altering ANYTHING, play some music or an exercise with this exact setting. Playing very softly requires a smaller aperture. If you practice very soft playing, somewhere around the top of the staff, for even just a few minutes a day, and try to play normal stuff with that setting, you will move to a more closed setting naturally.

    My 2 cents.

    John
     
  4. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Spend a week using a "pooh" attack. It keeps the lips together. After the week practice with the normal "tooh" attack.
     
  5. bach2112

    bach2112 New Friend

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    @stumac i was taught to tongue that way, but i feel that i am doing it incorrectly because i feel it go between my teeth and through my lips which creates the open apreture. I understand that the apreture must be open in order for the air to go through, but i feel that it is too wide open.
     
  6. bach2112

    bach2112 New Friend

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    Jun 12, 2010
    @jengstrom, I tried this and it definitely makes sence, but i still feel as if my tongue is creating my apreture and i am not using the proper mechanics to play softly, because it still feels very open when i play
     
  7. bach2112

    bach2112 New Friend

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    Jun 12, 2010
    And thanks, Vulgano Brother i will definitely try this out
     
  8. Harky

    Harky Pianissimo User

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    "Stumac" has hit the problem straight on. You will always have a hole in your aperture if you tongue your way. Guaranteed? The fix is as said above: The tip of the tongue goes behind the bottom teeth or just at the upper margin of the bottom teeth and you stop and start the air (tonguing) with the forward part of your tongue forward and up against the roof of your mouth or hard palate. I was taught your way in the 1960's and it screwed me up for forty years. I make the change over two years ago and it only took me about a month or so to get used to playing that way. This one's an easy fix.
     
  9. bach2112

    bach2112 New Friend

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    Thanks Harkey! Are there any specific exercises i should do to get used to tonguing this way?
     
  10. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Tonguing is one thing we can practice away from the trumpet. When walking or goofing off on the internet, try saying (sotto voce) "ToohToohToohToohToohTooh...." and/or "DoohDoohDoohDoohDoohDooh...." at different speeds.
     

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