How to get big sound in upper register

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Tobias014, Sep 18, 2013.

  1. Tobias014

    Tobias014 New Friend

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    I sound solid until high C then everything above that sounds small. No matter how much air I use I can't get a big sound in above high C. I don't have any trouble reaching higher notes (I'm good to high G), I just can't get them to sound the way I want them to.
     
  2. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    You need more air. I bet you are tensing up as you go higher, hence you thing you are producing more air, but you are likely cutting of the flow with strain. Use more air, but also relax. Easier said then done, but give it a try.
     
  3. Tobias014

    Tobias014 New Friend

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    I've tried using more air and I end up playing louder but not necessarily getting a full sound like I get at high C and below.

    Let me clarify. I can get loud sound above high C but not an open and powerful sound like I can get below high C. I can get plenty of sheer volume in the upper register but there's no power behind the loudness and it sounds falsetto (like a piccolo trumpet) instead of open.
     
  4. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Think going higher in comparison to the pipes of an organ. It is physics, you can't create the flow of air equal to the bigger pipes unless you increase the velocity of your air, viz push your air faster. Still the audio volume wlll be less than the big pipes and you might not even hear what you play unless you amplify it.
     
  5. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    Tobias,

    If this question relates to using the 17c4 mouthpiece you mention in your other thread, then you need a seriously strong embouchure to have endurance and power beyond high C.

    For mere mortals like us, a balance must be struck between strength in the lower and upper ranges, and most symphonic players will opt for something less punishing than your mouthpiece for the extreme register.
     
  6. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Didn't say use more air... I said relax... relax... relax
    I believe you are cutting yourself off.
     
  7. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    I honestly do not believe this is a mouthpiece issue.
     
  8. JNINWI

    JNINWI Piano User

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    Good comments !

    Understanding a few concepts makes a huge difference in the upper range.

    1. Your upper range takes less air than in the staff
    2. Your upper range takes faster air than in the staff

    Air volume and air velocity are very different than each other and how and when you use them makes all the difference in the world. Even after you understand “Where” they come into play on the horn, you still have your work cut out for you although the understanding is half the battle. Look up Volume and velocity on the Internet to make sure you understand the definitions fully. Common mistakes made in trying for the upper range are, using WAY to many facial muscles than is really necessary, and cutting off the air velocity with your aperture when up there. How do you fix this? Time, patience, using tools like mirrors and your brain.
    Lets say your going up for your top note just to assure yourself you’ve still got it. You take in a big breath of air, set your diaphragm, set the horn on your face and up you go. What are you doing to get there, are you tensing up your upper body ? Are you squeezing your chops together to make a smaller hole for the air? Do you look like you were sucking on a lemon ?
    If you are you will get a hollow sound, that is IF you don’t completely shut off all the air.
    Now try this, set up your air, place the horn on your face and as you go up stay relaxed in your whole upper body, including your face, (look in a mirror, do you look like you ate something sour, you shouldn’t), back off on your mouthpiece pressure, and keep your aperture OPEN so this fast air has someplace to go. Use your TOUNGUE by pushing up and forward to the front of the roof of your mouth to speed up the air not your aperture. Your aperture will close slightly as you ascend, that’s all. Most important, play pianissimo only. Don’t try this at a loud volume, you first have to be able to play up there softly before you play loud. Gmonady is correct, relax, relax, relax….. Watch youtube videos of the big boys playing in the upper range, no change in their expressions from in the staff to upper range...... Relax.....
     
  9. Sidekick

    Sidekick Mezzo Piano User

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    JNINWI excellent advice and descriptions of the process.

    I only wish that you hadn't said that Gmonady is correct....you'll only encourage him.:D
     
  10. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Relax... I won't bite back!
     

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