How to get big sound in upper register

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Tobias014, Sep 18, 2013.

  1. Ljazztrm

    Ljazztrm Piano User

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    That is a good one sure..As far as your typical lead and all around good mouthpieces, I think the Bill Ratzenberger jet-tones were some of the best ever in the world. Man, someone just posted this on the MF board the other day...OMG...incredible! Chicago 77 in Maynard Ferguson and General Music Forum
     
  2. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    Ljazztrm - you are most likely correct as I'm using an Asymmetric 3C+544 - which is essentially a 3C with a reduced volume cup - BUT NOT reduced depth -- but UNLIKE GM, I have no gigs other than community bands - so a G on the top of the staff is all I need. So my recovery time from the "octave higher" practices are irrelevant in a sense. PERHAPS as GM eloquently mentioned I might be putting unnecessary stress on my jaws/lips etc. ---but I also play trombone --- so I have decided to NOT switch mpc. --- I've tried shallow pieces but don't like them --- nonetheless for the "every other day or so " of high trumpet range it sounds pretty darn nice on the mpc/horn combo I've got
     
  3. afp

    afp Pianissimo User

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    King,

    My main gig is a community jazz band, and I need to have a High G (4 ledger lines above the staff) to play many of the charts we play. High G is a note I play scales up to every day. Every other day I work up to DHC. If you are only able to play your 4 ledger line High G or A every other day, and you want to consistently own those notes, then you'll probably have to learn stop forcing the notes. With the exception of what John Lynch teaches, almost every technique for gaining command in the upper range stresses finesse and gaining control through soft playing.

    Roger Ingram, Chris LaBarbra, "Casual DHC", Cat Anderson, etc all teach starting softly in the upper range and never forcing anything. They do that because forcing out loud high notes kills endurance, and high notes don't have to be loud to be heard if they are focused and in tune. What I think is an MP volume High F or G from behind the horn actually screams out over the whole band when they are at a FF level. Trying to play it any louder makes it lose focus and unnecessarily tires me out. Even when playing a mid range solo, say C to High C, an MP to MF level of effort is all that is needed when I am in tune and focused.

    Anyway, if you are happy where you are, great, but if you really want to consistently own the upper range it will likely require and adjustment in your approach.
     
  4. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    That makes sense actually - I do some of the Cat Anderson method of soft long tones and it's very beneficial. I can usually play the DHC (if I'm not pushing the high range for the previous day or so. I've lost 50% of my hearing ( although, they say that doesn't encompass the 3000 HZ or so of the DHC. I will say - most of my " above High C" - I'm looking for consistent sound that seems full. My bet is when I'm achieving that in the upper register, like you say it is FF, BUT sounds only mp to me. Perhaps I will ask someone in community band at WHAT VOLUME DO THEY PERCEIVE my high notes to be. Thus far, I've tried NOT to let anyone know that I can play above the staff - 1 music teaching trombone player from our "sister" band knows there's at least a decent High A (the 5th stave) - but I swore him to secrecy until I get the consistent "everday High A +" - YES THANKS for the volume dynamics observation - the trombone player said - wow that's a SWEET HIGH A
     
  5. neal085

    neal085 Mezzo Forte User

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    Well, it's only been the last few months that my chops have reached the point where I completely own A above the staff (when I say own, I mean i can grab a horn, stone cold, and hit it on the first try with no warm up). I can work up to a high E sometimes, but it takes too much effort, so I've backed off on pressure and worked on playing up to B or C above the staff with minimal effort. It sounds so pretty when I do it right, and doesn't wear out my chops.

    I play with some guys from church from time to time - they're all on guitars and piano, and we just randomly pick hymns or gospel stuff and play by ear. I noticed that I can hang for about 45 minutes to an hour, then my chops are D.O.N.E., even though I never go above F on the staff. So..... I started focusing all my practice time on low, low pressure, regardless of what I'm playing. Seems to be making a difference, because we were playing Sunday night for over an hour, and I was playing with a mute the whole time. When we quit, my chops felt about as fresh as when we started.

    My experience is pretty limited compared to most of you, but I tend to think that high-pressure and over-blowing are the trumpeter's worst enemies.
     
  6. afp

    afp Pianissimo User

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    I always thought of "owning" a note as being able to play it at various dymanic levels, in tune, with the ability to bend it sharp and flat at will, and the ability to do all this for the length of my endurance. This happens after warm up. I can pick up my trumpet cold and hit a DHC, but I don't own that note yet.

    Endurance seems to be one of the last things to solidify. Range comes much earlier in ones development. I think we get the range after we have developed enough chop strength (which is less strength than many think), and endurance comes when we figure out how to play efficiently using things like proper air support, visualizations a such as tongue arch, and the right mental concept of how to play.
     
  7. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Endurance comes from many low-impact repetitions. Playing in-tune pedal tones, especially from pedal c on down, helps train the muscles needed for the upper register It is no substitute for high-range work, but helps to give us endurance in all registers.
     
  8. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Naah, Owning a note means you pay me the right to use that note. It now costs $75 to own a note. I will send you a nice certificate authenticating your ownership of said note. It will make a handsome display to your Den's wall collection.

    Make your check out to Gary M. Onady, MD, PhD, Professor of Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, Room 105 Medical Sciences Building, Wright State University Boonshoft School of Medicine, Dayton, Ohio 45435.
     
  9. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    By the way, the school of medicine were I work was named after Mr. Boonshoft who donated $48 Million to the school. So far I have donated $14,000 to the school. I asked the Dean what I get to be named after me. He promptly replied, a urinal in the men's room. No... Seriously, this conversation actually took place. Now officially, I really am a peeon.
     
  10. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    My notes are only $25 each to own - the catch is you can only use them every other day ROFL ROFL ROFL
     

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