How to make a silver trumpet nice and shiny

Discussion in 'Trumpet Repair and Modification' started by codyb226, Dec 1, 2011.

  1. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

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    Yep, that's what I use, but most of the major brands are the same. The proponents of the salt bath make the point that polishing removes silver in the process of removing the oxidation. That may be true, but if you use a liquid polish and soft cloth, the horn won't be any worse off for wear. That's if you polish it a couple times a year - overdoing it and/or using an abraisive paste like MAAS or Semicrome could eventually wear some of the silver off. Here's my 1976 Bach Strad, which is the trumpet I play most of the time. I've owned it since he early 1980's, and have polished it a couple times a year as I described. Still looks fine to me...

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2011
  2. codyb226

    codyb226 Banned

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    I have decided to get some wrights and if I really need to I will give it a salt bath.
    Thanks guys.
     
  3. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    It does remove microscopic amounts of silver. Thus peoples want to use another method of cleaning that doesn't remove the valuable silver. Because literally, your silver is going down the drain!
     
  4. veery715

    veery715 Utimate User

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    Two different concerns regarding silver (plate or solid) upkeep.

    1. Tarnish: This is a chemical reaction between the silver molecules and sulfur in the atmosphere. It changes the appearance from silver colored to brown or black depending on the extent and length of exposure. Can be removed with a good polish or by using the electro-chemical process involving salt/baking soda, aluminum foil and worm or hot water. Note - the electro-chemical process removes no silver metal.

    2. Scratches: These are removed by evening out the surface where they show, by polishing, in a process that starts with coarse scratching and moves progressively through finer and finer scratches until they are nearly invisible. The same process is used in making wood shiny - sanding with a grit coarse enough to obliterate the surface imperfections, and then proceeding with finer and finer grits until the scratches are so small they don't show.

    It is a process which removes material, so we need to do it carefully and minimally. There are some modern products as well as types of wax which can fill scratches so that they are hidden from sight. Commonly these are used on car finshes which are materially much different from silver. But they can be used to minimize the appearance of scratches w/o the risk of removing metal.
     
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2011
  5. codyb226

    codyb226 Banned

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    That is what I want it to look like!
     
  6. codyb226

    codyb226 Banned

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    If I get a valve guard, which I will, will it have an effect on the valve block silver? Like is some stuff gets under the silver. I do not want it to wear away anywhere. This is my first pro horn and it is silver, I will worship this horn and only want the best. Does a valve guard have to be special if it has a 1st valve trigger?
     
  7. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    Yes, it will trap dirt no matter how often you take it off to clean it (think 1000 grit sandpaper). It will also change the sound by dampening it a little. Glove,hanky, or just wiping clean with a microfiber cloth will be better options in my opinion.
     
  8. codyb226

    codyb226 Banned

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    I am trying to make it so my hands have as little contact as possible. My 2335 is starting to get lacquer wear on the valve block, very little but it is there. I got it brand new 5 years ago. Would it work if I took it off after every use?
     
  9. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    I don't like them and don't use them. If you just clean it after you play it, you'll be fine. Lacquer is not as resilient or hard as metal plating and after 5yrs., I would expect a small amount of wear.
     
  10. codyb226

    codyb226 Banned

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    How about silver, does it take longer to wear then lacquer?
     

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