How to make my silver trumpet shiny?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by 12erlgro, Dec 21, 2010.

  1. 12erlgro

    12erlgro Pianissimo User

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    Last edited: Jul 12, 2012
  2. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

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    Liquid silver polish used on a soft cloth a couple times a year won't harm the silver enough to worry about.
     
  3. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    I'm not sure what is available to you but semi annual cleaning with a good silver polish/cream will not harm you horn. Not cleaning it would be worse. In between those cleanings, soaking in dish washing soap (liquid kind) will keep it looking good. You can also buy a silver cleaning cloth that will keep it clean if you don't want to polish.
     
  4. SteveRicks

    SteveRicks Fortissimo User

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    Do a search for cleaning silver on the website. There are instructions for chemically removing the oxidation with aluminum foil and baking soda (i.e., rverses the tarnishing process). It is easy to do -baking powder, aluminum foil and hot water. Using silver polish rarely -like once every year or two or on "difficult spots" won't hurt enough to make a difference, but you don't want to use it often as it works by removing silver (abrasive). The aluminum foil method does it chemically without removing any silvertakes away the bad while not harming the good atoms.

    Get a good soft cloth and wipe the horn down every time you finish playing. I use the microfiber cloths from Wal Mart. Also, give the horn a bath several times a year (water and dishwashing detergent-Dawn works great. Rinse well. Dry with cloth. Don't forget to wash the cloth every couple of months.
     
  5. fraserhutch

    fraserhutch Mezzo Piano User

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    MAAS polish. That's the ticket. And a nice chamois cloth.
     
  6. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    the materials used in brass instruments are soft. Brass, lacquer, silver plate or gold plate all are subject to "wear" when excessive force is applied. That force can be as simple as a paper towel that scratches the finish.

    I bought a Bach C trumpet in the early 70s and used Tarnishield and a soft cloth for many years. Now I lay the horn in hot salt water with a piece of aluminum foil. The oxide from the silver oxide tarnish moves chemically (actually electrically) to the aluminum foil, leaving the horn shiny with no removal of material.
     
  7. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    How much salt do you use and do you wrap the horn or is just laying it in there (the aluminum foil) enough?
     
  8. 12erlgro

    12erlgro Pianissimo User

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    Last edited: Jul 12, 2012
  9. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    fill sink with hot water, add 4 big spoons of salt, lay a big piece of aluminum foil in the sink, place the trumpet parts in the sink, wait 20 minutes, rinse trumpet to get the salt out, reassemble, enjoy
     
  10. SteveRicks

    SteveRicks Fortissimo User

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    Rowuk,

    As you indicated, it is very important to rinse the horn thoroughly when using salt. Just think what road salt does to auto metal when left exposed for some time. Of course, a good rinse will solve the issue. I wonder if using baking soda might be better for some who aren't as diligent about cleaning. By the way, is it baking soda or baking powder?
    Steve
     

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