How to make my silver trumpet shiny?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by 12erlgro, Dec 21, 2010.

  1. ComeBackKid

    ComeBackKid Fortissimo User

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    It's baking soda - the sodium is the common element between baking soda (sodium hydroxide) and salt (sodium chloride). I think the salt works better and is no more corrosive than baking soda. I can't imagine anyone going through the process and then neglecting to rinse (sort of like leaving shampoo in one's hair?).
     
  2. 12erlgro

    12erlgro Pianissimo User

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    .
     
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2012
  3. ComeBackKid

    ComeBackKid Fortissimo User

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    I can't answer in a public forum. If my wife sees the figure, she will shoot me.
     
  4. ChopsGone

    ChopsGone Forte User

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    You may still need to resort to the washing soda (let's get the right stuff, gang, it's sodium carbonate, not sodium bicarbonate) and foil method, but you can get a very good start with Hagerty's "Silversmith's Spray Polish". It's mild and effective, and nowhere near as hard on the finish as a paste polish. Even if you use a paste, try Hagerty's or Wright's before resorting to something like MAAS (great stuff, but not necessarily the best thing to use on silver plating).

    Once you've gotten the horn cleaned, treat it to one of John Ogilbee's anti-tarnish bags and it'll stay that way.
     
  5. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

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    Iike I said...

    Here's my '76 Bach Strad. I've had it since the early 80's, and have polished it from time to time with liquid (not paste) silver polish - I don't like tarnished silver horns. The silver plating is still fine. If folks want to do the submerged chemical reaction method, knock yourselves out. It's really not an issue unless you use a polish with abraisives. I wouldn't use MAAS unless you have deep tarnish issues that other methods won't remove. It will remove the plating if you use it vigorously and often.

    [​IMG]
     
  6. SteveRicks

    SteveRicks Fortissimo User

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    Okay -Sodium Carbonate, not bicarbonate. You say washing powder. So don't use baking soda or powder? Where do you get washing soda? Wal Mart? Name of brand? Thanks.

    Do you think sodium chloride (table salt) works as well, better, worse?
     
  7. SteveRicks

    SteveRicks Fortissimo User

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    Okay guys, I'm sitting here looking at 2 boxes -one is Winn Dixie baking soda which says sodium bicarbonate. I also have a box of Argo baking powder -Double acting aluminum free as it says on the label. Ingredients are sodium acid pyrophosphate, soduium bicarbonate, corn starch, and monocalcium phosphate. Do either of these boxes work or what should IU be getting?
     
  8. ChopsGone

    ChopsGone Forte User

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    Washing soda is marketed by Arm & Hammer, and can usually be found at Ace Hardware if you don't see it in your local supermarket's laundry additives section (near the bluing and borax).
     
  9. Jackson Arch

    Jackson Arch Piano User

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    There he goes again! Flaunting another great picture of a fine horn. :thumbsup:

    (I dare someone to mention "engraving" in this thread.)
     
  10. stricd

    stricd New Friend

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    Oct 19, 2010
    Ditto what he said. My '78 Bach looks identical (so I just used his picture:), and I have polished it once or twice a year for 32 years (Wrights). Not worth stressing over. Most of the plating loss that I have seen on horns has been at contact points (third valve casing, bottom of bell tube, etc), rather than from polishing.
     

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