How to not annoy people when warming up?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Tobias014, Oct 3, 2013.

  1. trumpetsplus

    trumpetsplus Fortissimo User

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    One of the best pieces of advice I had from a teacher is that part of your practice routine should include the ability to be able to play without "warming up". He recommended starting the day with a medium volume high G for 4 - 6 beats

    Imagine that you were delayed on the way to a big gig: Does the audience have to wait whilst the trumpet player prepares himself?

    IMO the requirement for this type of noodling/warming up is more psychological than physical. I used the James Stamp routine to warm up all the time I lived in Australia. When I came to the US fifteen years ago I stopped that warm-up, cold turkey, and replaced it with "Reflections" a simple sequence using a 2 octave run. When I attend a rehearsal or a concert I only play a half dozen or so notes for reassurance. I am happier than ever about my playing these days.

    If you really have to do all those calisthenics get a decent practice mute - like Trevor Bremner's ssHH mute. Then all your playing is for yourself, not as intimidation for the rest of the room.
     
  2. JNINWI

    JNINWI Piano User

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    I have my own warm up routine that I do before a show. It entails long tones / pedal tones / flexibilities and range expansion. Takes about 10 minutes or less but it’s something I need to do to get all the systems fired up and working correctly. If I don’t do this it takes away from my endurance and overall sound. I too don’t like to bother other people when doing this and also need a space with no distractions to get through it with the most benefit. So I always warm up right before I leave the house. Sometimes it’s hours before I play but I’ve found that this warm up lasts all day, so when show time comes all I need is a minute or two of soft warm up and I’m ready to go, no bothering fellow musicians now….. Most musicians don’t mind at all but there’s always a few that don’t want to hear it. For those times that I can’t get a warm up at the house, there’s always a mouthpiece in my car and a silent mute in my gig bag….
     
  3. gzent

    gzent Fortissimo User

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    Warming up on stage is very unprofessional.

    In practice is a different matter. You do what you have to to prepare for an organized practice.
    However, I see excessive warmup routines as annoying, because I don't want to hear it.
    Develop an embouchure that needs less than a minute to be ready to perform and you will be
    most appreciated by fellow musicians.
     
  4. JNINWI

    JNINWI Piano User

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  5. gzent

    gzent Fortissimo User

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    If you absolutely cannot warmup off stage, like say you are in a band doing a bar gig without a "green room", then
    point your bell toward the back of stage and do some soft lip slurs up and down a few times, save the "music" for the
    audience.

    It is really odd that musicians need to be told this, but two great musicians playing two different songs simultaneously
    comes across as noise to the audience. Don't make them hear it before a show, it just seems bush league.

    Frankly, I find the practice of orchestras warming up on stage very odd also.
    When I go to Orchestra Hall in MPLS to see a different musical act, they don't come out on stage and warm up and tune
    for 10 minutes before the show. They walk out and play. Why do orchestras need to? Seems weird that some
    of the most proficient musicians in the business "need" this annoying warm up to produce a good performance.

    ...and don't give me that "they need to acclimate to the temperature and humidity of the hall" business.
    Any professional orchestra player that spends hours every week practicing in a hall should know how the environment
    affects their playing and adjust accordingly. I just don't get it.
     
  6. graysono

    graysono Mezzo Forte User

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    Noodling in all its forms and locales drives me crazy. Get rid of it and you are a step closer to behaving professionally.
     
  7. Dr.Mark

    Dr.Mark Mezzo Forte User

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    Hi Tobias,
    I use to get the same crap from people. First I would play some scales, a piece of a melody or two and then play some high notes like the entrance to Open Up Wide. Here's the thing. I wasn't showing off. I didn't design my warm up to play oneupmanship. It was my way of getting my body and mind ready. Do I still do the same thing? No. Now I buzz the mouthpiece a little on the way to the venue and then, once there, I'll play some notes and clap my hands to check out how the room sounds. All in all, piss on the people that don't like your warm up. As long as you're doing your warm up for the right reasons, it's no one's business how you warm up. If you're flashing around to impress then I'm sorry, the people are right(unless you're doing it to impress a member of the opposite sex then that would best be answered by going to noisymating.com).
    Hope this helps and if it's a mating issue, the offer of a coke, a hotdog and some time alone will probably get you a little further toward your goal.
    Dr.Mark
     
  8. SmoothOperator

    SmoothOperator Mezzo Forte User

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    There isn't any reason amateurs can't be held to these standards too. I mean it isn't like hitting a high G or anything. Just show up on time ready to play, what can be so hard about that? You aren't that great that four, five, ten... twenty people have to waste twenty minutes listening to you play lip slurs. Sure, I can sit at home and play until I get that high G, but I don't go out and do that in public. Hey guys, I'm almost there just a few more minutes I'll get it this time.
     
  9. JNINWI

    JNINWI Piano User

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    I like to go out behind the building I'm playing in, where nobody hangs out except the smokers, find a building about a 1/4 mile away and bounce my sound off it : )
     
  10. gzent

    gzent Fortissimo User

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    I used to do that when I wasn't playing as much as now.

    Now I just do the lip scale thing with absolute minimum pressure (see Nick Drozdoff video for demo) for
    about 30 seconds, rest, then a couple minutes before start of gig I do it again for maybe 20 seconds and I'm ready to roll.
     

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