how to pick a music school?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by momma_horn, Jan 29, 2011.

  1. momma_horn

    momma_horn Pianissimo User

    65
    3
    May 8, 2010
    Again, good advice. Youi are right, Satchmo...you never know how "THE PLAN" will change. Lots of opportunity for change at a bigger school although I see da kid in a smaller university vs a Big Ten school. Much of it is out of my hands, I feel....and we still have time....so I suppose anything could happen between now and then...like maybe she'll decide to go to Law school after all :) (No shot of that happening. Just sayin')
     
  2. Sterling

    Sterling Mezzo Forte User

    771
    230
    Oct 22, 2007
    Marcellus, NY
    Listen to Veery. Ithaca college is a good school with a 4 1/2 year program with two degrees: education and performance. My wife did this years ago on French Horn. Kind of expensive, though.
     
  3. leftmid7

    leftmid7 Mezzo Piano User

    619
    84
    Sep 21, 2010
    Franklin, TN
    And I hate to be a downer, but the music industry across the board is in the dumps. I don't care of you're talking pop/rock or 'legit.' Getting a Music Ed degree doesn't even guarantee a 'fall back'. The arts programs are the first ones to be cut when districts have to balance budgets.

    I know she's just a kid, but she needs to be sure there's NOTHING she would rather major in than play/teach music and be willing to scrap for it. That's just how it is. There are many good schools were there are opportunities to still play and become a fine musician even if it's not her 'main' thing. And many people are fine with that.
     
    momma_horn likes this.
  4. jmberinger

    jmberinger Pianissimo User

    97
    23
    Jun 5, 2007
    Long Beach, California
    At the end of the day, being a professional "working" musician is about acquiring and maintaining relationships. Most of the initial relationships, the ones that get you in the door before you have your "professional reputation", are acquired at the school that you attend.

    They are acquired from the teachers, and their relationships, and the musicians that you play with while you are there. If you are looking to be a professional working musician, you must choose a school that is currently the vogue in the musical environment in which you want to work.

    Studio work: Los Angeles. Symphony: Chicago or other major city. Shows: New York.

    There are many, many very accomplished trumpet performers that can cut every note of every composition that will ever be written. And many are in the practice room for the rest of their life because they did not make the relationships in college. Blind auditions not withstanding, it is who lets or invites you play that makes the difference when you are trying to make a living.

    A back up? Be a computer person, a plumber, an electrician or a chiropractor. Still lots of time to practice, and, if you leave that profession to play your trumpet, you can always come back to a pay check.
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2011
    momma_horn and Vulgano Brother like this.
  5. momma_horn

    momma_horn Pianissimo User

    65
    3
    May 8, 2010
    Thanks guys...I know...and I agree about this not being a great time to go into the music field as a musician, anyway.
    However...I tried to broach the subject of perhaps thinking of another major and minoring in music....well the DRAMA THAT conversation created showed me 'da kid's dedication to her craft. However, I am not adverse to gently trying to steer her in a direction that might be a steadier paycheck. Music business? Music engineering? Anything, guys?
     
  6. leftmid7

    leftmid7 Mezzo Piano User

    619
    84
    Sep 21, 2010
    Franklin, TN
    If she goes to a reputable liberal arts college she'll be well prepared to go directions. Remember, something like 80% of grads end up doing something different than their major anyway. So to contradict myself...lol.
     
  7. momma_horn

    momma_horn Pianissimo User

    65
    3
    May 8, 2010
    good line of thinking, Lefty.....I don't know how they expect kids to plan their life out at the age of 16.
     
  8. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

    7,799
    2,359
    Oct 18, 2007
    The Wide Brown Land
    Momma Horn, we here on TM all have varying levels of passion for the trumpet - very few of us are professional players. Admittedly, some like Mr Wise can make a living but that will be based on a huge reputation and immense skill developed over many decades - 'da kid' doesn't have that luxury.

    Many of us here play as a recreation, my calling for example is aviation maintenance, which I now teach, and I play (but not for cash). ROWUK is in IT, teaches trumpet, and plays at a high level - but probably doesn't generate enough grocery/beer vouchers for his family to prosper from his music. Trent runs a music/trumpet retail outlet, and plays. Jason makes bespoke horns, and plays. Nick teaches science in high school, and plays.

    Can you see a way to let 'da kid' make a few life mistakes while she follows her passion. It sounds like she has the intelligence to get to the point where she will discover that maybe she can't make enough to live off her passion - she can be a very very fine player whilst transmitting that passion into the music education of others, for example.

    My band director is an amazing saxophonist who put himself through University by busking on railway stations but has studied Education, majoring in Music Education - he runs a couple of bands, works in the school system as a music educator, shares a beer with me, and we enjoy playing - he has done it with immense support from his parents - I guess that is your continuing role.

    The options ARE open - but the chances of a career as a full time player are a function of skill level, exposure, opportunity, and luck - and then there IS the very valid track via the military.

    Be bold - kids learn a LOT faster than we ever did. It is a bit of a truism but most kids entering school now will end up in careers that don't yet exist. See if you can give her some space to 'fail', hard I know, but vital for survival (and most of us have been there).
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2011
    momma_horn likes this.
  9. momma_horn

    momma_horn Pianissimo User

    65
    3
    May 8, 2010
    thanks Ted...
    so does that mean you think I should still support her w/the desire to go to college as a doubl music (performance and edudcation) major even while that future looks dim?

    Letting her fail-yeah....I can do that if I have to...it's just what we parents "MUST" do on occasion, however painful it is. It would just seem to be a very expensive life lesson to go through.


    You know me..the LAST thing I want to do is dim that passion of hers.


    And who knows? With that passion, It COULD work out for her. :dontknow:
     
  10. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

    16,412
    7,537
    Dec 22, 2008
    Virginia
    It is easy to see where her passion comes from! I have no doubt you will find what is best for her. You have the "due diligence" part down to a "t". North Texas was mentioned earlier in this post and I will second that recommendation (I am not a grad). When I was in high school, it was the trumpet players place to go to school ( that was in the '70's!). I would not rule out smaller conservatories either since the student teacher ratio is low. As has been mentioned, just because a school is expensive doesn't mean you can't afford it. My son had the choice between a private or state school. The private school was 50k+ vs. 8k for the state school. By the time it was all said and done with scholarships and aid, the cost were about the same so don't rule out the "expensive" schools.
     

Share This Page