How to play staccato

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Tobias014, Oct 13, 2013.

  1. dangeorges

    dangeorges Pianissimo User

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    Mr. Semman,
    You say that "...he tongue still has to block the flow of air..."

    If you mean that you always need to stop the flow of air with your tongue on all staccato notes - I disagree with this. The tongue does not need to block the flow of air for staccato notes.

    If you mean that only YOU need to do this, then that's another story.

    I can only tell you that I play staccato notes without stopping the air with my tongue. Maybe I'm the oddball or exception, but to me it sounds way better than cutting off the note with my tongue.
     
  2. barliman2001

    barliman2001 Fortissimo User

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    It's rather dangerous to say things like that... ONce, in the Bavarian Radio Philharmonic Orchestra, the solo French horn complained to the conductor that a passage was unplayable at that speed. The conductor - Lorin Maazel - replied: "Really? Give me your horn." and played the part in question faultlessly and at the required speed.... The ICDT approach (I Can't Do That) is reserved for viola players.
     
  3. mrsemman

    mrsemman Piano User

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    I am using the Claude Gordon method, which places the tongue, lightly anchored to the bottom teeth. The tongue then moves against the top teeth to produce the tongue accent or attack. The air flows over the top of the tongue and is blocked, albeit briefly, when the tongue strikes the upper teeth. This does not mean that you or others have to use the same method.
     
  4. dangeorges

    dangeorges Pianissimo User

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    Whatever technique works for you - I agree. I'm not saying that we should all use the same technique or method.
    But the end result (not cutting off the sound with your tongue) should be the same (my opinion, of course).

    Maybe I'm missing something, but it sounds like the OP is attacking correctly, but is cutting off the sound with his tongue as well.
    In other words, it doesn't seem like he's making a breath attack - but is using "T" as the attack and "T" to stop the sound as well.
    It's the stopping of the sound with another attack of the "T" (tongue) that he's trying to get rid of.

    But again, maybe I'm missing something.
     
  5. dangeorges

    dangeorges Pianissimo User

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    Oct 20, 2010
    Tobias - question of clarification:
    Do you need help in just playing RAPID staccato or with ANY staccato?
    Thanks!
     
  6. mrsemman

    mrsemman Piano User

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    I definitely agree. But, like all of us, he has to analyze what he is doing, and practice not doing it. I merely referenced what I did. I NEVER tell people what they HAVE to do, only what other options are available. They can choose to do it or not.
     
  7. dangeorges

    dangeorges Pianissimo User

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    Oct 20, 2010
    ?
     
  8. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    If the tut-tut angle of this discussion has been closed out......

    What is the current philosophy on duration of a staccato note?

    I was taught that tenuto should be played (at least) the written duration; portato maybe 75%; staccato, 50% and spiccato something less than that.

    But when I was taught you could get a bag of chips wi' bits for thruppence and a lot of things have changed since then.
     
  9. dangeorges

    dangeorges Pianissimo User

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    Maybe I was taught Old School style, but the duration of a staccato note varies with the tempo of the tune you're playing. It's not an absolute.

    Since staccato means "separated," this only indicates that the note should not be connected to the next note.
     
  10. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    And also with musical style - what works for a trumpet voluntary might not for Mahler's Vth. I was specifically interested in how Arban expected his exercises (particularly the early ones) to be executed. The text doesn't give any meaningful guidance.

    Which is a reasonable working definition for portato (combined tenuto/staccato). This isn't 'Old School'. My impression is that in recent times, staccato notes are being played longer, and portato is being squeezed out into obscurity - which your posting tends to confirm.
     

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