How to practice

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by PwnageSoul, Oct 15, 2008.

  1. PwnageSoul

    PwnageSoul New Friend

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    Oct 15, 2008
    Hi, I'm new here on the forums. I was just wondering how I can practice efficiently. I heard that keeping a trumpet practice log is really good, but how do you construct one? What exactly would you write, and what would be the format? Thanks.
     
  2. MLanghardt

    MLanghardt New Friend

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    Apr 7, 2007
    Las Vegas, NV
    Welcome to TM! Keeping a log of your practice is very helpful to some. I would record what you played and for how long, the format is really up to you. The most important part of practicing I believe is developing a daily routine. My daily routine consists of buzzing (on the leadpipe.) Long tones in all registers. Descending and ascending lip slurs. Expanding scales. Chromatic Scales (ala Clarke.) High range lip slurs and playing several things out of arban. An efficient practice session should cover all aspects of playing evenly. Strive to become a balanced player in all styles of music. Let your tone be your guide while always striving to make the most beautiful sound you can each time you play. Here are some notes on practicing from Bud Herseth.Myspace.com Blogs - Notes on Bud Herseth by Tim Kent (former student) - Las Vegas Trumpet Hang MySpace Blog Best of luck with everything you do, there are several amazing players on here who can give you some great advice.
     
  3. et_mike

    et_mike Mezzo Forte User

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    Oct 16, 2007
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    I keep a log to help me stay on track. Because I have a full time job and other responsibilities, I don’t get as much time to practice as some others, so I don’t work on all the technical stuff every day. I break it up and then rotate through it…. So if I work on fingering exercises today, I will work on tonguing tomorrow, so on and so forth… the log helps me keep track of where I am. So a typical practice schedule for me looks like this…. Times all very depending on the amount of time I have.

    1. Relaxing, BREATHING and becoming centered… I always start with this!!
    2. Long tones and mouthpiece Buzzing ( not everyone likes this, some use the leadpipe some don’t do it all)
    3. Lip Slurs out of the Collins book
    4. Music!! Always practice being musical (I use alot of Arban's to keep things new)
    5. Technical stuff of the day (Clarke for fingering, Arban's for tonguing and ornamentals)
    6. I like to end by running some scales, I run 5 or 6 scales, using different scales everyday, sometimes I just run the scale studies in Arban's and I run them super soft….

    So that is what I do… might not work for you, but isn’t a bad place to start… and you will get plenty of info here, so when you figure out what you like and put it together feel free to share it with us!
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2008
  4. Bloomin Untidy Musician

    Bloomin Untidy Musician Piano User

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    Jan 14, 2008
    Staffordshire
    MLanghardt thanks for the Herseth link. Very interesting!


    Cheers

    B.U.M.
     
  5. oldlips48

    oldlips48 Piano User

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    Mar 1, 2007
    One of our members here, Nick Drozdoff, is a professional player with a day job as a school teacher. He has some information on working in practice time during his work day at his website: Nick Drozdoff :: Home

    Hope that helps.

    Steve
     
  6. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Practicing efficiently has a lot to do with patience and not so much with organization.

    My take is that you get a daily routine that lasts from 20 - 30 minutes with breathing, long tones, slurs, scales and basic tonguing (all played at pianissimo). You commit that to memory and play it EVERY DAY for the rest of your life. If you maintain that, you will at least be able to keep a reasonable standard.
    Everything else that you play is sugar on top: tunes, technical studies, chop calisthenics.

    Another tip: NEVER EVER play tunes when you are tired or your face is wasted. Music is the reason that we play and tunes deserve the real quality time that we have to offer. I play/practice tunes after my routine. Once the tunes are done, the technical stuff can be tackled - also at pianissimo!!!!!!!

    If you want to write that down, fine. I only ask the kids that I teach to take notes if there is a problem..............................
     
  7. Mason

    Mason Pianissimo User

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    Oct 7, 2008
    Australia
    My teacher told em to do long not scales to build up your lips. So i do them and they work fine.
     
  8. charlie636

    charlie636 New Friend

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    Aug 9, 2008
    San Diego, CA
    How to breathe

    Whats A good exercise to build up my wind? I practice long tones first, for as long as the note sounds good. Is there a rule for taking a breath during an exercise? Is there a way to fill up quick and stay with the time signature?

    I'm a new student.

    Thank You
     
  9. Mason

    Mason Pianissimo User

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    Oct 7, 2008
    Australia
    im not sure. i usually keep my back straight when i play to keep a good diaphragm when breathing. I think the more you play gradually you will build up your air capacity. Although with exercises, im not sure. i guess long tones scales are good.
     
  10. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Re: How to breathe

    Interesting question:
    most people "breathe" just fine until they get told by somebody with NO IDEA OF WHAT IS GOING ON how to do it better.

    You build up wind simply by breathing more deeply - without forcing in OR out. Do a search on "circle of breath" here at TM. That is my personal take. As far as the trumpet is concerned, you need to build habits and that simply takes time. There are no short cuts!!!!!!
     

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