How to put in a straight mute quickly

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by keigoh, Apr 11, 2013.

  1. VetPsychWars

    VetPsychWars Fortissimo User

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    Wow, what alternate reality do you live in? You pick the mute out of the holder 8 to 16 bars beforehand and are playing one-handed while waiting for the one bar where you shove it in, cursing the arranger for making you do that silly stuff.

    Tom
     
  2. VetPsychWars

    VetPsychWars Fortissimo User

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    PS... guess who never played a musical? ;-)

    Tom
     
  3. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Ahhh Tom... I actually believe we agree... I basically said the same thing you did... but I left out the part as to were I grab my mute. It's just that did not put in the explanation on your original link to the rim as you did in post 11, and that explanation clearly helps. As for me, I pull mine out of my mute bag atop my Torpedo Coyote 2.5 rather than us the rim... or I pick it up off the floor if I am not permitted to stow my trumpet bag on stage. And I do believe we probably use the same curse for the arranger as well.
     
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2013
  4. VetPsychWars

    VetPsychWars Fortissimo User

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    Now I am certain that you have never played a musical.

    You would know.

    Since you don't... you need to play a musical. I recommend "The Music Man".

    Tom
     
  5. -C-

    -C- Pianissimo User

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    Just have the flute player hand it to you.
     
  6. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    I have played many a musical and yes, "The Music Man" is under my belt. I suggest you play some big band charts written by non-trumpet players that expect you to go in and out of a Harmon mute with only a quarter rest prior to the change.

    Yep, Musicals... at least the writers of musicals are humane to trumpet players. But when you play jazz... There's trouble in River City my friend.
     
  7. bumblebee

    bumblebee Fortissimo User

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  8. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    To quote KT: "ROFL ROFL ROFL"
     
  9. coolerdave

    coolerdave Utimate User

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    I always thought that was the reason for both cornet and trumpet parts in band music ... poor kids stuck on the trumpet book waiting for a straight mute part in their music to be able to play a few notes.
     
  10. nieuwguyski

    nieuwguyski Forte User

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    I just finished a stretch during which I played "42nd Street," "Bye Bye Birdie," and "Hello Dolly" in consecutive months. They were all community theater jobs, but I always try to honor the ink, no matter how ridiculous.

    As far as I'm concerned, it's never the singular mute change that makes me curse an arranger -- after all, that's what the pinkie ring is for. It's the rapid-fire multiple mute changes. "42nd Street" calls for nearly impossible plunger/solotone/cup-mute changes. I forget the exact particulars in "Birdie" and "Hello Dolly," but there were points where I was pulling a mute from the bell and dropping it in my lap, then turning a page and frantically grabbing another mute from my mute rack for the next entrance.

    My recollection of "42nd Street" is that it's particularly hard. Even at the end of the run, knowing what was coming, my success rate on some of the mute changes was depressingly low.
     

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