How to sing in the horn?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by frankmike, May 31, 2010.

  1. veery715

    veery715 Utimate User

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    Just an offshoot of this idea, is something I read in John Haynie's book Inside John Haynie's Studio.

    He talks about articulating the music as if he was singing the lyrics. Give it a try by playing a tune - a standard maybe - for which you know the words, and use those words to shape how you articulate the notes.

    People would tell him, "You sure can make that horn talk!"
     
  2. guyclark

    guyclark Piano User

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    HI, guys!

    I'm not a big fan of multiphonics. To me, it's an effect, best used sparingly. It also is not well suited to trumpet, as the human voice is really too low pitched for the trumpet to reproduce well. On lower pitched instruments, such as Euphonium or French Horn, it can be used (occasionally!) for good effect.

    Typically, one sings the third of a chord (IIRC) and the fifth appears as if by magic. Of course, it's not magic, it's a phenomenon known as Heterodyning, which is what happens when you mix two signals of different frequencies, and get the sum frequency and the difference frequency. The sum frequency is often too high to be heard, but the difference is often quite obvious. It's also known by the term "Beating" When two people play the "same" note, but slightly out of tune, the notes "beat" against one another at the difference frequency. If I play A 440, but you play A 441, we'll get a one second "beat" between us.

    I often use the term "singing" throught the horn as a way of expressing a natural, un-forced tone quality: a type of playing in which the instrument is as if it were a part of the player's body. As part of this approach, I like to know what the words of a song I'm playing are, so that I can phrase and articulate much as the singer would do in singing the part.

    Hope that clarified one or two things...

    Guy
     
  3. Sofus

    Sofus Forte User

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    GC, since you´ve entered the difficult physics
    that I tried to avoid, we might as well clarify
    one more thing; the mixing only happens if the
    two signals "meet" in a nonliniar media . . .

    Another matter of interrest is that although the mixing
    of two signals to get new ones is not very often used
    in brass music (no matter whether one or two people play)
    there has been written some interresting 3 voice
    music for 2 recorders. Two recorders play and a third
    voice (plus others that are not so easy to hear) is heard,
    making full three note chords altogether. The choice of which
    notes the two recorders play is of course crucial, since the
    difference in frequency between them must create a new note
    that fits them chordwise . . .
     
  4. guyclark

    guyclark Piano User

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    Hi, Sofus!

    You are right about the non-linear device... in this case it's the ear/brain system that is non-linear!

    When I was young, my parents had an electronic organ that had a pedal keyboard. I used to like to play seconds on them and listen to the "WowwoWWowwoWWowwoWWowwoW..." sound I'd get from them beating. :roll:

    I now hate hearing this beating in my various groups, when people can't seem to correct for these miniscule discrepancies in pitch!:thumbdown:

    In electronics, the problem isn't usually making a non-linear device to "mix" the signals in, it's making a sufficiently linear device to PREVENT the signals from mixing and producing Intermodulation Distortion (in audio equipment, anyway)

    Guy
     
  5. Sofus

    Sofus Forte User

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    I don´t know about you, Guy, but

    MY BRAIN IS QUITE LINEAR! :noway:



    ;-)
     
  6. guyclark

    guyclark Piano User

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    Mine is completely bent!

    All the diodes in my left side hurt as well!

    :-P

    Guy
     
  7. Sofus

    Sofus Forte User

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    That´s why I stick to ECC85 . . .
     
  8. guyclark

    guyclark Piano User

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    I'm old enough that I've got 1N34s... all Germanium... low forward voltage, but they sometimes ache like mad!

    (to the rest of you, sorry for the electronics and Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy references!) :shock:

    Guy
     
  9. Sofus

    Sofus Forte User

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    Yes, my apologies too! Back to order! :D
     
  10. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    NE5532 that replaced 12AX7s for me. 1 channel for playing, one for singing.....
     

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